Latest news: Call for Papers for Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., Jan. 7-10 2016

Call for Papers for Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., Jan. 7-10 2016

February 26th, 2015 § Comments Off on Call for Papers for Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., Jan. 7-10 2016 § permalink

From Thursday, January 7 through Sunday, January 10, ADS will hold its 2016 annual meeting at the new Marriott Marquis in Washington, D.C., hosted as usual by the Linguistic Society of America.

Theme: Dialect and innovation at the turn of the 21st century. From Sali A. Tagliamonte, ADS President-elect and program chair:  Dialects are a vibrant part of North America, but there are still many unstudied geographic areas and social groups. Dialects are commonly thought to be rural, old and obsolescent, but dialects are constantly being formed or reconfigured as cultural change takes place and new communities (both virtual and non-virtual) emerge and evolve novel features. Many linguistic features remain to be documented. This year, let us work towards bringing new phenomena to our meeting, whether obsolescent or innovative, working towards a comprehensive documentation of forms and features of all kinds at the turn of the 21st century.

Monday, August 17, is the deadline for proposals for 20-minute presentations. All you need is a title and an abstract of 150 to 300 words, preferably in Microsoft Word. Send it via e-mail to Executive Secretary Allan Metcalf at americandialect@mac.edu. Proposals will be judged anonymously. If your proposal is accepted, you’ll be asked for an abstract of no more than 200 words for the LSA program.

You may also collaborate with others and propose a panel, with an abstract explaining the whole and naming the panelists.

This year a poster session will again be available. If you prefer to present at a poster session, please say so with your proposal.

Presenters must be current members of the American Dialect Society. Become a member here.

Teaching panel: As usual, the ADS Committee on Teaching will sponsor a panel at the annual meeting. If you would like to propose a 20-minute talk, or two or three coordinated talks, send your proposal directly to the chair of the Committee on Teaching, Anne Curzan, at acurzan@umich.edu. Her deadline is also August 17.

Panel on employment opportunities for linguists across the educational spectrum. This panel will present internship and non-academically focused career options at all levels of linguistic education: bachelors, masters, doctoral. Proposals are invited for brief (10-15 minute) presentations. If you have created such an internship or had success advising students into particular careers or work in an industry or organization that employs linguists, particularly those focusing on Sociolinguistics and/or Variation, please submit your abstract to Julie Roberts, at Julie.Roberts@uvm.edu. Her deadline is also August 17.

Audio-visual equipment: An LCD projector with sound will be available for all presentations, along with a microphone. If you will need other equipment, please say so when you send your proposal.

Scheduling: The meeting will follow this schedule:

Thursday, January 7: Executive Council and annual business meeting in afternoon. Program session in late afternoon, followed by Word of the Year nominations.

Friday, January 8: Program sessions in early morning and all afternoon. Poster session in late morning. Words of the Year vote and Bring-Your-Own-Book reception in early evening.

Saturday, January 9: Program sessions in morning and afternoon; Annual Luncheon in between. Luncheon speaker: Gregory Guy, New York University.

Sunday, January 10: Program sessions in morning.

 Session chairs: If you’re interested in chairing a session, let the Executive Secretary know at americandialect@mac.edu. Tell him any preference you have for time or topic.

Travel grants for students: Four travel grants of $500 each will be awarded to students whose papers have been chosen for the program. Furthermore, all students who are members of ADS are invited to attend the Annual Luncheon for free.

Travel grant for ADS member: The fifth annual Audrey Duckert Memorial Travel Award of $500 to attend the Annual Meeting will be given to an ADS member. The recipient will be chosen by ADS President Robert Bayley. Applications in the form of a letter to President Bayley will be due after the program for the Annual Meeting has been determined. Audrey Duckert was a long-time member of ADS and co-founder of the Dictionary of American Regional English.

Hotel and registration: ADS members will be eligible to reserve rooms and register for the meeting at LSA member rates. For details see the website www.lsadc.org.

Future LSA-ADS meetings: 2017: Austin (Texas) Jan. 5-8, JW Marriott. 2018: Salt Lake City, Jan. 4-7, Grand America Hotel. 2019: New York City Jan. 3-6, Sheraton New York Times Square.

WOTY: As we have done for a quarter of a century, we will choose candidates for Word of the Year on Thursday and vote for our WOTY the next day, with our Bring Your Own Book exhibit and reception immediately following. Nominations for Words of the Year can be submitted all year long to woty@americandialect.org.

UPDATED Schedule for Annual Meeting in Portland, Ore., Jan. 8-11, 2015

January 9th, 2015 § Comments Off on UPDATED Schedule for Annual Meeting in Portland, Ore., Jan. 8-11, 2015 § permalink

This is schedule for the American Dialect Society’s annual meeting in Portland, Ore., January 8-11, 2015, held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Linguistic Society of America. More information about the conference (including hotel information) is here http://www.linguisticsociety.org/event/lsa-2015-annual-meeting.

Executive Council
GENERAL INFORMATION

From Thursday, January 8 through Sunday, January 11, ADS will hold its 2015 annual meeting at the Hilton Portland, hosted as usual by the Linguistic Society of America.

Hotel and registration: ADS members are eligible to reserve rooms and register for the meeting at LSA member rates. For details see the website www.lsadc.org.

REGISTRATION: We are expected to register with LSA for the meeting. ADS members who do not belong to LSA may register at the special ADS member rate.

ADS REGISTRATION: Additional and entirely optional, but those who attend ADS sessions are encouraged to register with the ADS Executive Secretary for $20, students $10. This helps defray the cost of our BYOB reception and earns you a distinctive decoration for your LSA badge.

LUNCHEON: At 12:15 p.m. Saturday, January 10. Speaker: Ceil Lucas, Professor Emerita, Gallaudet University: “Black ASL: The Socio-Historical Context.”

Cost is $40. Students who are members of ADS may attend free. Reservations may be made in advance with ADS Executive Secretary Allan Metcalf at americandialect@mac.edu.

WOTY: The open nominating meeting for Words of the Year 2014 is at 6:15 p.m. Thursday, and the final vote at 5:30 p.m. Friday (see schedule below). Members and friends are invited to participate at both meetings.

Name of the Year: At the start of our WOTY session on Friday, we will also host the American Name Society’s announcement of its vote on Name of the Year 2014.

BYOB Reception: After the Friday voting on Words of the Year, you’re invited to our annual Bring-Your-Own-Book reception from 6:45 to 7:45 p.m. Bring your new book or books; we’ll have tables along the walls where you can display them.

Future LSA-ADS meetings: 2016: Washington (D.C.) Jan. 7-10, Marriott Marquis. 2017: Austin (Texas) Jan. 5-8, JW Marriott. 2018: Salt Lake City, Jan. 4-7, Grand America Hotel. 2019: New York City Jan. 3-6, Sheraton New York Times Square.

Program Committee: Robert Bayley, University of California Davis, chair. Readers for this year were: Maciej Bananowski, Richard Cameron, Anne Curzan, Betsy Evans, Valerie Fridland, Joan Houston Hall, Cory Holland, Tyler Kendall, Ruth King, Mary Kohn, William Kretzschmar, Ceil Lucas, Naomi Nagy, Dennis Preston, Erik Thomas, Daniel Villarreal, Walt Wolfram, and Malcah Yaeger-Dror.

Schedule of sessions

Thursday, January 8

Executive Council

1:00 – 3:00 p.m., Hilton Portland, Skyline 3

Open meeting; all members welcome. Chair: ADS Vice President Robert Bayley..

Annual Business Meeting

3:00 – 3:30 p.m., Hilton Portland, Skyline 3

Most of the business of the Society is conducted at the preceding Executive Council meeting, to which all members are invited (see above). But it is this Business Meeting that elects new ADS officers.

Nominating Committee report: The committee (Connie Eble, chair; Luanne von Schneidemesser, David Bowie) proposes:

Vice President and program chair for two-year term 2015-16, succeeding to the presidency 2017-18: Sali Tagliamonte, University of Toronto.

Member of the Executive Council for four-year term 2015-18: Sonja Lanehart, University of Texas at San Antonio.

Member at large of the Nominating Committee for two-year term 2015-16: Betsy Evans, University of Washington.

Additional nominations may be made by a petition signed by at least ten members in good standing, to be received by the Executive Secretary no later than December 17.

Those elected take office after the conclusion of the 2015 Annual Meeting.

ADS Session 1

4:00 – 6:00 p.m., Hilton Portland, Skyline 2

Chair: Sonja Lanehart, University of Texas – San Antnio

4:00 Jack Grieve (Aston University): Mapping lexical spread in American English

4:30 Taylor Jones (University of Pennsylvania) ‘Yeen kno nun bout dat’: Using Twitter to map AAVE dialect regions

5:00 Tracy Conner (University of Massachusetts Amherst): Ellipsis licensing and copula/possessive optionality in African American English

5:30 Erica Britt (University of Michigan-Flint): Preaching, performance, and the comedy of Richard Pryor

Words of the Year Nominations

6:15 – 7:15 p.m., Hilton Portland, Skyline 2

Chair: Ben Zimmer, Vocabulary.com.

Open meeting of the New Words committee; ADS members and friends welcome. This meeting reviews nominations for Words of the Year 2014. Final candidates will be identified in preparation for the vote at 5:30 p.m. Friday.

(Sister Society Meet and Greet Reception)

sponsored by the Society for the Study of Indigenous Languages of the Americas

Porto Terra Lounge, 8:30 – 10:00 p.m. (Cash bar)

Friday, January 9

POSTERS

ADS posters may be viewed on Friday in the Exhibit Hall near the elevator bank. ADS presenters are asked to be present between 12:30 and 1:30 p.m. (and optionally at other times; LSA posters are to be attended by authors between 10:30 a.m. and noon Friday, and ADS presenters may be there then too).

Douglas Bigham (San Diego State University)

Danielle Jenné (San Diego State University)

Taylor Mahler (San Diego State University)

Indexing Chill: GOOSE, GOAT, and Bro-Dudes of the Urban Southwest

Christina Schoux Casey (Old Dominion University)

From ‘who dat say who dat’ to the ‘Who Dat Nation': Shifting terms of whitewashed Black speech.

Lauren Colomb  (University of South Carolina)

Construction of local identity and ethnicity in the speech of African American jazz musicians in New Orleans

Valerie Freeman (University of Washington)

The prevelar vowel system in Seattle

Kristen Mullen (Florida International University)

A cross-generational analysis of Spanish-to-English calques in emerging Miami English

Dennis Preston (Oklahoma State University and Michigan State University Emeritus)

Obligatory Nonstandards: How high-falutin(g) are you?

Ian Stewart (Dartmouth College)

We some young kings: the demographics of African American English on Twitter

Sali A. Tagliamonte (University of Toronto)

Kinza Mahoon (University of Toronto)

Lyndsey Leask (University of Toronto)

Hills and hails in the Madawaska Valley: Introducing a unique Canadian dialect

ADS Session 2: Speech in the Western States

8:30–11:00 a.m., Hilton Portland, Skyline 2

Chair: Betsy Evans (University of Washington)

8:30 Kara Becker, Anna Aden, Katelyn Best, Haley Jacobson (all Reed College): Variation in West Coast English: The case of Oregon.

9:00 Valerie Fridland (University of Nevada Reno), Tyler Kendall (University of Oregon), Craig Fickle (University of Oregon): It’s Nev-ae- da, not nev- ah- da!

9:30 Robert Kennedy (University of California, Santa Barbara), James Grama (University of Hawai‘i at Manoa), Heather Llewellyn (University of California, Santa Barbara): On the nucleus-offglide trajectory of the mid-back rounded vowel in California English.

10:00 Annette D’Onofrio, Penelope Eckert, Robert Podesva, Teresa Pratt, Janneke Van Hofwegen (all Stanford University): Low vowel variation in California

10:30 Alicia Beckford-Wassink(University of Washington ): Vowel raising in Washington State: What’s the BAG deal?

ADS Session 3

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., Hilton Portland, Skyline 2

Chair: Kathryn Remlinger, Grand Valley State University

11:30 Charles Boberg (McGill University): World War I and the consolidation of Canadian English

12:00 Matt Hunt Gardner (University of Toronto), Sali A. Tagliamonte (University of Toronto): The bike, the back, and the boyfriend: Confronting the “definite article conspiracy” in Canadian and British English.

ADS Session 4

1:30–3:00 p.m., Hilton Portland, Skyline 2: Teaching Panel

Chair: Anne Curzan (University of Michigan).

1:30 Robert Bayley, Chelsea Escalante, Renee Kemp, Alex Mendes, Emily Moline (all University of California, Davis): Where have all the participles went? Using Twitter data to teach multivariate analysis

2:00 Dan Villarreal University of California Davis), Ariel Loring (California State University Sacramento): Teaching world Englishes to undergradtuates: Tensions and pedagogical insights

2:30 Kelly Abrams, Trini Stickle (both University. of Wisconsin Madison): Discovering DARE: Creating a DARE Curriculum for secondary and postsecondary coursework

ADS Session 5

3:30–5:00 p.m., Hilton Portland, Skyline 2

Chair: Luanne von Schneidemesser (DARE)

3:30 Laurence Horn, Jim Wood, Raffaella Zanuttini, Grace Brody, Laura DiNardo,Luke Lindemann (all Yale University): Here’s us a new methodology: the Southern Presentative Dative meets Mechanical Turk

4:00 Paulina Bounds (Tennessee Tech University), Jacqueline Hettel (Arizona State University): Signal-to-noise ratio in creation of perceptual maps

4:30 Allison Burkette (University of Mississippi), Lamont Antieau (Anvil Editing): Individual language as a complex system

Words of the Year Vote

5:30 – 6:30 p.m., Hilton Portland, Skyline 1

Words in half a dozen categories as well as a Word (or Phrase) of the Year 2014 will be chosen from the slate of nominees determined at Thursday evening’s meeting. Before each vote, brief statements will be invited from advocates for or against the candidates.

The hour will begin with the American Name Society’s vote on its choice of Name of the Year. All ADS members, ANS members, and friends are welcome to participate.

Bring-Your-Own-Book Exhibit and Reception

Co-sponsored by Duke University Press, publisher of American Speech

6:45–7:45 p.m. Hilton Portland, Skyline 1

Saturday, January 10

ADS Session 6

8:30–10:00 a.m., Hilton Portland, Skyline 2

Chair: Phillip Carter, Florida International University

8:30 Lara Downing (The Ohio State University): “Dutchified” English among the Mennonites of Ohio

9:00 David Durian (Northern Illinois University):Revisiting the development of the Northern Cities Shift in late 19th and early 20th Century Chicago: Another Look at Pederson’s PEMC data, DARE, and LANCS

9:30 Kelly Abrams, Tom Purnell (both University of Wisconsin-Madison): Locating the Appalachian dialect boundary in Maryland: Morpho-syntactic evidence.

ADS Session 7

10:30 a.m.–12:00 noon, Hilton Portland, Skyline 2

10:30 Phillip Carter, Salvatore Callesano (both Florida International University): Perceiving Spanish in Miami: The interaction of top-down and bottom-up stimuli

11:00 Mary Kohn (Kansas State University), Erin Callahan (Western Carolina University): Local and supra-local variation in Latino English

11:30 Phillip M. Carter, Nandi Sims, Lydda López (all Florida International University): Spanish substrate influence on Miami Latino English

ADS Annual Luncheon

12:15–1:45 p.m., Hilton Portland, Skyline 1

Speaker: Ceil Lucas, Professor Emerita, Gallaudet University: “Black ASL: The Socio-Historical Context.”

Cost is $40. Students who are members of ADS may attend free. Reservations may be made in advance with ADS Executive Secretary Allan Metcalf at americandialect@mac.edu.

ADS Session 8

2:00–4:00 p.m., Hilton Portland, Skyline 2

Chair: Tom Purnell, University of Wisconsin-Madison

2:00 Katie Carmichael (Virginia Tech): “I’m so New Orleans, when I go out of town people ask me if I’m Canadian”: Canadian Raising as an innovation in New Orleans English

2:30 Janelle Serediak, Alexandra D’Arcy (both University of Victoria: Old njooz or noo nooz? A diachronic look at yod dropping.

3:00 Sky Onosson (University of Victoria), Becky Roeder (University of North Carolina Charlotte), Alexandra D’Arcy (University of Victoria): City, province, or region? What do the vowels of Victoria tell us?

3:30 Burns Cooper, Siri Tuttle (both University of Alaska Fairbanks): Front vowels in Fairbanks

Sunday, January 11

ADS Session 9:

8:30–10:30 a.m., Hilton Portland, Skyline 2

8:30 Joel Schneier (North Carolina State University): Style-shifting in texting: Quantitative evidence from an elicitation experiment

9:00 Jon Forrest (North Carolina State University): Frequency effects and vowel lenition in (ING)

9:30 Ruth Maddeaux (University of Toronto):Me, myself & I: The role of the untriggered reflexive in the English pronominal system

10:00 Jennifer Renn (Center for Applied Linguistics): Investigating the relationship between African American English use and early literacy skills

ADS Session 10

11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Hilton Portland, Skyline 2

11:00 Emily Nguyen (New York University): L-vocalization among Vietnamese Americans in Minnesota

11:30 Danielle Schuld, Joe Salmons (both University of Wisconsin-Madison): Hearing a new accent: Changing perceptions of Wisconsin English over time


12:00 Paul Reed (University of South Carolina): Appalachian local orientation and intonation: A sociophonetic account

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