There are 12 messages totalling 292 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. May Day (2) 2. A Fey Day May Day Hey Dey (6) 3. No subject given (2) 4. Michail's final 5. Bounced Mail ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Wed, 1 May 1996 02:40:36 -0400 From: TERRY IRONS t.irons[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MOREHEAD-ST.EDU Subject: May Day Workers of the World Unite! Examine your role in the continuance of human oppression. Celebrate May Day. Terry ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 1 May 1996 07:39:31 -0400 From: David Muschell dmuschel[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MAIL.GAC.PEACHNET.EDU Subject: Re: May Day Workers of the World Unite! Examine your role in the continuance of human oppression. Celebrate May Day. Terry Three imperatives: sounds oppressive to me. David ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 1 May 1996 10:04:51 -0600 From: Samuel Jones smjones1[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]FACSTAFF.WISC.EDU Subject: Re: A Fey Day May Day Hey Dey Workers of the World Unite! Examine your role in the continuance of human oppression. Celebrate May Day. Terry I say KEEP HIM IN IRONS!! ____________________________________________________________________________ DR. SAMUEL M. JONES INTERNET: smjones1[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]facstaff.wisc.edu Prof. of Music & Latin American Studies TELNET: samjones[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]macc.wisc.edu 5434 Humanities Building FAX: 608 + 262-8876 (UW) 455 North Park Street __________________________________________ University of Wisconsin-Madison TELEPHONES: 608 + 263-1900 (UW-Lv. message) Madison, WI 53706-1483 * 608 + 263-1924 * (UW-Office - * VOICE MAIL--Lv message) ____________________________________________________________________________ "Pen-y-Bryn" TELEPHONES: 608 + 233-2150 (Home) 122 Shepard Terrace 608 + 233-4748 (Home) Madison, WI 53705-3614 ____________________________________________________________________________ ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 1 May 1996 13:46:25 -0400 From: Jules Levin jflevin[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UCRAC1.UCR.EDU Subject: Re: A Fey Day May Day Hey Dey I'm glad to see some people on the list have a sense of humor (perhaps even Terry....? Can he be serious???) Anyway, enough decades have gone by that there may be a few young whippersnappers out there who haven't heard Adlai Stevenson's remark: Eggheads of the world, Unite! You have nothing to lose but your yolks! Anyway, enjoy... At 10:04 AM 5/1/96 -0600, you wrote: Workers of the World Unite! Examine your role in the continuance of human oppression. Celebrate May Day. Terry I say KEEP HIM IN IRONS!! ____________________________________________________________________________ DR. SAMUEL M. JONES INTERNET: smjones1[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]facstaff.wisc.edu Prof. of Music & Latin American Studies TELNET: samjones[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]macc.wisc.edu 5434 Humanities Building FAX: 608 + 262-8876 (UW) 455 North Park Street __________________________________________ University of Wisconsin-Madison TELEPHONES: 608 + 263-1900 (UW-Lv. message) Madison, WI 53706-1483 * 608 + 263-1924 * (UW-Office - * VOICE MAIL--Lv message) ____________________________________________________________________________ "Pen-y-Bryn" TELEPHONES: 608 + 233-2150 (Home) 122 Shepard Terrace 608 + 233-4748 (Home) Madison, WI 53705-3614 ____________________________________________________________________________ ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 1 May 1996 13:58:54 -0400 From: David R Beach dbeach[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]OSF1.GMU.EDU Subject: Re: A Fey Day May Day Hey Dey Dyslexics of the world untie! Happy May Day! david ------------------------------------------------------------------------- * David Beach + ESL Coordinator/Consultant * * The Writing Center at George Mason University * * 4400 University Drive + Fairfax, VA 22030-4444 + USA * * tel: +1-703-993-1200 fax: +1-703-993-3664 * * dbeach[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]gmu.edu + http://osf1.gmu.edu/~wcenter * "That so few now dare to be eccentric marks the chief danger of our time." --John Stuart Mill ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 1 May 1996 11:43:23 -0700 From: Peter McGraw pmcgraw[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CALVIN.LINFIELD.EDU Subject: Re: A Fey Day May Day Hey Dey On Wed, 1 May 1996, David R Beach wrote: Dyslexics of the world untie! Happy May Day! david Shouldn't that be "Happy Yam Yad"? Peter ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 1 May 1996 14:19:44 -0600 From: Luanne von Schneidemesser lvonschn[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]FACSTAFF.WISC.EDU Subject: Re: A Fey Day May Day Hey Dey Whatever happened to the pleasant tradition of May baskets? Not a single one here in Wisconsin. Luanne Dyslexics of the world untie! Happy May Day! david Shouldn't that be "Happy Yam Yad"? Luanne von Schneidemesser Dictionary of American Regional English 6129 H.C. White Hall, 600 N. Park St. University of Wisconsin-Madison Madison WI 53706 (608) 263-2748 ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 1 May 1996 15:49:23 EDT From: Michael Montgomery N270053[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UNIVSCVM.CSD.SCAROLINA.EDU Subject: No subject given Dear Friends, A candid statement from a final exam I have just read: "Out of all the different dialects, Standard English is the one that is most wildly used." Is this why some of us don't communicate with our students as well as we'd like? A gentle end of the semester to all, Michael Montgomery Dept of English Univ of South Carolina ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 1 May 1996 16:03:55 EST From: Boyd Davis FEN00BHD[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UNCCVM.UNCC.EDU Subject: No subject given Like Michael, busily grading papers - but the recent spate of MayDay messages reminds me of my favorite license plate in Charlotte. It's on the back of a Rolls Silver Cloud: LYSDEXIA ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 1 May 1996 13:10:58 -0700 From: Peter McGraw pmcgraw[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CALVIN.LINFIELD.EDU Subject: Re: A Fey Day May Day Hey Dey On Wed, 1 May 1996, Luanne von Schneidemesser wrote: Whatever happened to the pleasant tradition of May baskets? Not a single one here in Wisconsin. Luanne That's because, if I remember correctly, in Wisconsin May doesn't arrive until June. :-) (Sorry, couldn't resist.) Peter ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 1 May 1996 16:31:49 -0500 From: Lewis Sanborne lsanbore[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]SAUNIX.SAU.EDU Subject: Re: Michail's final Like Michael, I just had a pleasant chuckle while reading papers: "From the moment a child is born, it is treated in a manor according to its gender." I can see the twin palaces now. Lew Sanborne lsanbore[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]saunix.sau.edu English and Academic Support St. Ambrose University Davenport, IA 52803 319 333-6335 ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 1 May 1996 19:13:38 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Bounced Mail **************************************************************** REMINDER: WHEN INCLUDING A PREVIOUS LIST POSTING IN SOMETHING YOU'RE SENDING TO THE LIST, BE SURE TO EDIT OUT ALL REFERENCES TO ADS-L IN THE HEADERS. **************************************************************** Date: Wed, 1 May 1996 19:16:38 -0400 From: "L-Soft list server at UGA (1.8b)" LISTSERV[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uga.cc.uga.edu Subject: ADS-L: error report from GUVAX.ACC.GEORGETOWN.EDU The enclosed message, found in the ADS-L mailbox and shown under the spool ID 2820 in the system log, has been identified as a possible delivery error notice for the following reason: "Sender:", "From:" or "Reply-To:" field pointing to the list has been found in mail body. ---------------- Message in error (36 lines) -------------------------- Date: Wed, 01 May 1996 19:16:40 -0400 (EDT) From: "Peter L. Patrick" PPATRICK[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]guvax.acc.georgetown.edu Subject: Re: "Language for Time Travelers" Subj: "Language for Time Travelers" "Language for Time Travelers" by L. Sprague De Camp was published in Astounding Science Fiction in 1938. The magazine (now called Analog) might be ready for another article on the subject by now. If not, one of the other science fiction magazines might be interested. I think De Camp's article is most easily available now in _The Best of L. Sprague De Camp_. It was less inclusive than the title indicates; it concentrated on English. Dan Goodman I bet the DeCamp best known to ADSers is David. And I've wondered for some time now, is there any relation between these two? Just how common is the last name? (I've never heard it for anyone else.) --peter ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 30 Apr 1996 to 1 May 1996 *********************************************** There are 5 messages totalling 117 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. ADS-L Digest - 30 Apr 1996 to 1 May 1996 (3) 2. Duh! (2) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Thu, 2 May 1996 00:07:32 -0400 From: ALICE FABER faber[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]HASKINS.YALE.EDU Subject: Re: ADS-L Digest - 30 Apr 1996 to 1 May 1996 Michael Montgomery wrote: | Dear Friends, | | A candid statement from a final exam I have just read: | | "Out of all the different dialects, Standard English is the one that is | most wildly used." ^^^^^^ | Is this why some of us don't communicate with our students as well as we'd | like? Isn't this evidence of the intrusive /l/ we were talking about before we got sidetracked by May( )day, or at least some kind of linguistic insecurity engendered thereby? | A gentle end of the semester to all, Indeed. Alice Faber ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 2 May 1996 10:42:00 -0700 From: David Robertson net091[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RISCY.SFCC.CTC.EDU Subject: Re: Duh! Hi there; Did you who are interested hear yesterday's "All Things Considered" on National Public Radio? They aired a story on words being added to Webster's Dictionary, including "Duh!" There was also a memorable illustration of the use of several of the new entries at once, being a sentence about Ruth Bader Ginsburg being bummed when phallocentric Chechens dissed her in cyberspace. Good fun and fairly informative. NPR supplies tapes of its broadcasts for a fee, I believe. Cheers -- Dave ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 2 May 1996 15:40:28 -0500 From: Katherine Catmull kate[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]BGA.COM Subject: Re: Duh! On Thu, 2 May 1996, David Robertson wrote: NPS supplies tapes of its broadcasts for a fee, I believe. You can also listen to their broadcasts in real-time (that is, you don't have to wait ages for the sounds to download) on the NPR web site. Kate Catmull kate[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]bga.com ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 2 May 1996 21:25:07 -0500 From: Dan Goodman goodman[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]FREENET.MSP.MN.US Subject: Re: ADS-L Digest - 30 Apr 1996 to 1 May 1996 Date: Wed, 01 May 1996 19:16:40 -0400 (EDT) From: "Peter L. Patrick" PPATRICK[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]guvax.acc.georgetown.edu Subject: Re: "Language for Time Travelers" Subj: "Language for Time Travelers" "Language for Time Travelers" by L. Sprague De Camp was published in Astounding Science Fiction in 1938. The magazine (now called Analog) might be ready for another article on the subject by now. If not, one of the other science fiction magazines might be interested. I think De Camp's article is most easily available now in _The Best of L. Sprague De Camp_. It was less inclusive than the title indicates; it concentrated on English. Dan Goodman I bet the DeCamp best known to ADSers is David. And I've wondered for some time now, is there any relation between these two? Just how common is the last name? (I've never heard it for anyone else.) A quick check of the Web through AltaVista shows other De Camps -- including another David. I suspect the two are distantly related. Dan Goodman (who is related to only two other Goodmans now living.) ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 2 May 1996 19:34:40 -0800 From: "Alan S. Kaye" AKAYE[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CCVAX.FULLERTON.EDU Subject: Re: ADS-L Digest - 30 Apr 1996 to 1 May 1996 New issue of California Linguistic Notes Attn: Fellow Linguists We are now producing Vol 25, No. 1, of CLN. If you have a review, short to medium article, or squib, the deadline will be June 1 for this issue. Also, jobs, announcements, news, etc. Let's hear from you: akaye[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]fullerton.edu. Alan Kaye, Editor Linguistics CSU, Fullerton Fullerton, CA 92634 ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 1 May 1996 to 2 May 1996 ********************************************** There is one message totalling 19 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. California Linguistic Notes 25:1 ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Fri, 3 May 1996 13:20:53 -0800 From: "Alan S. Kaye" AKAYE[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CCVAX.FULLERTON.EDU Subject: California Linguistic Notes 25:1 For a subscription to California Linguistic Notes, Vol. 25:1, remit $20.00 to CLN, Linguistics, California State University, Fullerton, CA 92634. The subscription will usually allow the subscriber to receive two issues (which are planned annually). If subscribers increase over the current number, then a third issue might be possible, depending on production costs then in effect. CLN 25:1 is now in preparation for appearance this summer. We need more articles (short to medium length), squibs, and reviews. Also, we feature jobs and announcements, and anything of interest to the profession. Anything accepted can also be published elsewhere (we will even say where). Please contact me if you have something. -----Alan Kaye-----Editor akaye[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]fullerton.edu Fax: 714-449-5954 ph. 714-773-3163 ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 2 May 1996 to 3 May 1996 ********************************************** There is one message totalling 32 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. Help wanted: African American dialects ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Sat, 4 May 1996 14:05:19 -0400 From: Allan Metcalf AAllan[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]AOL.COM Subject: Help wanted: African American dialects Would anyone be willing to respond to the following? Please send her a message directly at: slane[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]HUB.ofthe.NET (Sharon S. Lane); if it's of general interest, you might post it to ADS-L too. Thanks - Allan Metcalf ----------------------------------------------------- I am doing research for the elementary school principal for whom I work. She is interested in the effects that Black Dialect has on the school performance of inner city school children on standardized tests. She also wants information on Black or African American Dialect's origins and translations. I am not a linguist, so when I looked through your various sections on your web page, I was not sure where to start looking. Could you please help me? We do not want our students to loose their dialect, only to show them that there is a time and a place for all kinds of language. I would appreciate any sources or information you can give me. Thank you in advance for your assistance. Sharon Lane P.S. I can also be reached at Sslane[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]aol.com ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 3 May 1996 to 4 May 1996 ********************************************** There are 3 messages totalling 34 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. African-American English in the Schools (2) 2. more on African-American English in the Schools ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Sun, 5 May 1996 13:25:35 -0400 From: Ronald Butters amspeech[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ACPUB.DUKE.EDU Subject: African-American English in the Schools The best book on the subject that I know about is R. Burling's ENGLISH IN BLACK AND WHITE, published I beleive about 20 years ago by I bellieve Holt. the last time I used it it was still in print. A name to check is Walt Wolfram, who has published a lot in this field. You might also want to call the Center for Applied Linguistics in Washington, DC, and talk to Donna Christian. ------------------------------ Date: Sun, 5 May 1996 15:27:38 -0400 From: Ronald Butters amspeech[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ACPUB.DUKE.EDU Subject: more on African-American English in the Schools See also Walt Wolfram & Donna Christian, DIALECTS AND EDUCATION: ISSUES AND ANSWERS (Prentice-Hall, 1989). ------------------------------ Date: Sun, 5 May 1996 22:37:51 -0400 From: BARBARA HILL HUDSON BHHUDSON[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]GROVE.IUP.EDU Subject: Re: African-American English in the Schools Orlando Taylor and Richard Wright, both of Howard University, have also written on this subject. Barbara Hill Hudson bhhudson[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]grove.iup.edu ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 4 May 1996 to 5 May 1996 ********************************************** There are 11 messages totalling 346 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. Th Linguistic Autobiography (3) 2. The Linguistic Autobiography: Addendum 3. Linguistic bio assignment (4) 4. Linguistic Autobiography (2) 5. Ling Bio and Ellen Johnson ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Mon, 6 May 1996 12:34:27 -0400 From: "Bethany K. Dumas, U of Tennessee" dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UTKVX.UTK.EDU Subject: Th Linguistic Autobiography One of the joys of teaching is having an assignment succeed, especially in a large class. I love to teach Ling 200, our intro course. This year, we offered only one section, so I allowed students to add past the usual enrollment max of 32. Thirty-seven students finished the course. One assignment I periodically use is the linguistic autobiography. I got the idea from Raven McDavid many years ago, when I was visiting him in Chicago. I overheard a conference with a student and asked about the assignment. What I do is, towards the end of the course, ask students to write an essay accounting for how they use language and how they came to have the attitudes they have about the way other people use language. I read a first draft, which is usually heavy on family history, short on linguistic detail. I then make suggestions re the latter and ask for a final draft. Along the way, I share details from my own linguistic autobiography, beginning with my "Shirley stories." When I was 9/10, we moved to a "city" (Beaumont, TX), the first non-rural environment I lived in for any significant period of time. There for the first time I had a best friend, a girl named Shirley, who gave me some important training in rural/urban distinctions. Our first lesson. for instance, was triggered by my use of the term "washrag." "You shouldn't say 'washrag,'" Shirley responded. "Why not?" I asked, puzzled. "It doesn't sound nice," said Shirley. "Oh," I said, faced with a predicament. "Then what should I say?" "Wash cloth," said Shirley. "Why?" I asked. "It sounds better," said Shirley. Sociolinguistics 101! Shirley was little and cute and was determined to move up and out of the working-class neighborhood we lived in, and her linguistic instincts were quite sound, I think. This year, I required each student to give a 5-minute oral report to the class on the assn. The reports were funny, the papers are excellent, and I have now decided to modify the assignment by requiring students to audio or video-tape (themselves or family members) in connection with it in the future The idea came from a student who had a small part in the film, "Coal Miner's Daughter," when she was 6 years old as one of Loretta Lynn's twin daughters. Her one line included the word "probably." The scene had to be reshot several times, because her mother taught her to say /prab[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]bli/ instead of the expected /prabli/. The student showed the scene from the film in class. I have many wonderful examples of student analysis of family language. Perhaps I can find a suitable audience for a brief presentation. Anyone know of a conference with an appropriate theme? Bethany Bethany K. Dumas, J.D., Ph.D. | Applied Linguistics, Language & Law Dep't of English, UT, Knoxville | EMAIL: dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]utk.edu 415 McClung Tower | (423) 974-6965 | FAX (423) 974-6926 Knoxville, TN 37996-0430 | See Webpage at http://ljp.la.utk.edu ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 6 May 1996 14:03:07 -0400 From: "Bethany K. Dumas, U of Tennessee" dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UTKVX.UTK.EDU Subject: The Linguistic Autobiography: Addendum One of my students introduced her oral report by saying that she is "functionally" bidialectal. She talks "standard," but sings "country." She was taught to play the guitar by a country singer in eastern Kentucky. She gave us a few details, then picked up her guitar and demonstrated her skill by belting out a Johnny Cash number. Bethany Bethany K. Dumas, J.D., Ph.D. | Applied Linguistics, Language & Law Dep't of English, UT, Knoxville | EMAIL: dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]utk.edu 415 McClung Tower | (423) 974-6965 | FAX (423) 974-6926 Knoxville, TN 37996-0430 | See Webpage at http://ljp.la.utk.edu ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 6 May 1996 14:32:38 -0400 From: "Bethany K. Dumas, U of Tennessee" dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UTKVX.UTK.EDU Subject: Re: Linguistic bio assignment On Mon, 6 May 1996, mai kuha asked: Could you say a little more about how you handle the issue of student privacy in giving this assignment? Of course the students can complete the assignment without discussing every double negative and nonstandard subject-verb agreement ever uttered in their families, but isn't there some possibility that some individuals may somehow feel compelled to say more about their stigmatized linguistic behaviors than they wanted to? snip Clearly, these are important stories for the other students to hear, but what's a positive way to handle this so that nobody becomes too vulnerable? Thanks for your comment. Of course privacy is an important issue. I address it both directly and indirectly. First, I use the assignment late in the semester. By then, we know each other a bit (I have students work in groups on some exercises), and they have heard some of my Shirley stories, deliberately told to suggest my working-class origins. I have talked about what it is like to be the first generation to be university-educated. I have also brought in examples and small exercises from "real" life (for those of you who reall it, for two years, now I have used the "Barney Fag" question in class). Finally, I make it clear that the student may choose what to present in the five-minute report. I never ask questions about topics the student chooses not to report. And in the papers themselves, students often reveal more than they do in the oral reports, sometimes by inserting a "Like you, I .." (ex: "I, like you, also referred to a wash cloth as a wash rag.") But they also delight in referring to themselves as, for instance, "the king of infixing." I suspect that such matters are slightly less volatile here than on some campuses. I was very surprised to learn recently of the reaction to the original version of the film "American Tongues" on such campuses as Duke, where apparently showing the version containing the n-word guarantees a ruckus. I have shown the original version of that film to classes here for all the years it has been in existence. The only strong reaction to it I have ever had was by a woman from Newport (Cocke County), who took exception to the story about the West Virginian and his "you all stuff." (And, by the way, I always show the film early in the semester to L200 students.) We laugh at ourselves a lot in Linguistics 200 throughout the semester, and I think that helps a lot. In this section, there were about 6 true "hillbillies," about 6 true "Yankees," and about 6 deep Georgia Southerners (I was the only Texas) -- we all laughted about all the linguistic differences. Remember: I live and teach within about two miles of sites where I can hear native speakers of "dope" meaning "coke," double modals, a-prefixing, "don't care to" meaning "don't mind," monophthongized /ai/, etc. I try to capitalize on that fact. In our oral evaluation exercise at the end of the semester, the students insisted I must add field trips to the course. They would not take very long! Bethany Bethany K. Dumas, J.D., Ph.D. | Applied Linguistics, Language & Law Dep't of English, UT, Knoxville | EMAIL: dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]utk.edu 415 McClung Tower | (423) 974-6965 | FAX (423) 974-6926 Knoxville, TN 37996-0430 | See Webpage at http://ljp.la.utk.edu ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 6 May 1996 15:54:04 -0400 From: Ronald Butters amspeech[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ACPUB.DUKE.EDU Subject: Re: Linguistic bio assignment A question and a correction, Bethany: 1. What is the "Barney Fag" question? (I remember the "Barney Fag" incident--was it really two years ago?) 2. "American Tongues" did not stir up a fuss at all at Duke--and the scene with the word "nigger" uttered by a white man was not cut. Walt Wolfram told me (as I recall) that the word created quite a ruckus in some high schools, which led to an expurgated version of the film. ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 6 May 1996 16:23:23 -0400 From: "Bethany K. Dumas, U of Tennessee" dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UTKVX.UTK.EDU Subject: Re: Linguistic bio assignment On Mon, 6 May 1996, Ronald Butters wrote: A question and a correction, Bethany: 1. What is the "Barney Fag" question? (I remember the "Barney Fag" incident--was it really two years ago?) What I mean by the "question" is whether it is reasonable to claim that "Barney Frank" can become "Barney Fag" as a simple slip of the tongue. 2. "American Tongues" did not stir up a fuss at all at Duke--and the scene with the word "nigger" uttered by a white man was not cut. Thanks for the correction. Bethany Bethany K. Dumas, J.D., Ph.D. | Applied Linguistics, Language & Law Dep't of English, UT, Knoxville | EMAIL: dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]utk.edu 415 McClung Tower | (423) 974-6965 | FAX (423) 974-6926 Knoxville, TN 37996-0430 | See Webpage at http://ljp.la.utk.edu ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 6 May 1996 16:38:16 -0400 From: Jeutonne Brewer jpbrewer[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]HAMLET.UNCG.EDU Subject: Re: Th Linguistic Autobiography Interesting coincidence. This semester I used a linguistic autobiography assignment. (I had used a different variant of the assignment in earlier semesters. This semester's effort worked better than in the past.) During the first few weeks of the semester, I had students read Richard Gunter's "Linguistic Autobiography of and American," in Centennial Usage Studies [Greta D. Little and Michael Montgomery, eds. Publication of the American Dialect Society, No. 78. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press]. Then I had students write about their linguistic experiences in one of their early computer conferences. This was the first step in their thinking about and collecting information for a linguistic autobiography that they would complete and turn in in April. Gunter's article is one model (but not the only model) they could use. Like Bethany, my experience with the assignment was very positive. Today, the teacher for the Composition for Teachers class told me that some of my students had chosen their linguistic autobiographies to include in their writing portfolios. My class is a junior level class required for prospective teachers of secondary English. I didn't have the 26 students give an oral report, but now I wish I had. Thanks for that idea, Bethany. No questions about privacy came up. The students could choose one of a number of models--family language, memories of the "Shirley" type, etc. They could choose to write about their linguistic experiences as a college student, or they could focus on linguistic experiences during the current semester. Most students chose to write about family language or memories; one wrote about college experience. No student wrote only about the current semester. ************************************************** * jpbrewer[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]hamlet.uncg.edu * * Jeutonne_Brewer[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uncg.edu * * Jeutonne P. Brewer * * Department of English * * University of North Carolina at Greensboro * * Greensboro, NC 27412 * ************************************************** ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 6 May 1996 16:42:20 -0400 From: Jeutonne Brewer jpbrewer[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]HAMLET.UNCG.EDU Subject: Re: Linguistic bio assignment Ron, I'm glad to hear that "American Tongues did not stir up a fuss at Duke. Bill Coleman and I have been using the video regularly here and we haven't had any problems. ************************************************** * jpbrewer[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]hamlet.uncg.edu * * Jeutonne_Brewer[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uncg.edu * * Jeutonne P. Brewer * * Department of English * * University of North Carolina at Greensboro * * Greensboro, NC 27412 * ************************************************** ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 6 May 1996 15:54:55 -0500 From: "DICK HEABERLIN, ENGLISH DEPARTMENT, SOUTHWEST TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY" DH12[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]SWT.EDU Subject: Re: Th Linguistic Autobiography Speaking of Shirley stories--Southeast Texas Dialect-- and autobiography, I think immediately of Mary Karr's _The Liars Club_, which is a feast for anyone familiar with, or interested in, southeast Texas dialect. Dick Heaberlin, who grow up in Orange, before it became part of the Golden Triangle. ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 6 May 1996 17:14:27 -0400 From: "Bethany K. Dumas, U of Tennessee" dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UTKVX.UTK.EDU Subject: Re: Linguistic Autobiography On Mon, 6 May 1996, Jeutonne Brewer wrote: Interesting coincidence. This semester I used a linguistic autobiography assignment. (I had used a different variant of the assignment in earlier semesters. This semester's effort worked better than in the past.) During the first few weeks of the semester, I had students read Richard Gunter's "Linguistic Autobiography of and American," snip Gunter's article is one model (but not the only model) they could use. Students always ask for a model. So far, I have resisted providing one, primarily because I think my students do more creative work if they don't have a model to follow. I do not think models are bad, just that my students tend to follow them slavishly. How do you get around that, Jeutonne? Or is that a problem? I will not even show them previous students' essays (even with the previous students' permission!). (I have not read Gunter's essay yet.) Bethany Bethany K. Dumas, J.D., Ph.D. | Applied Linguistics, Language & Law Dep't of English, UT, Knoxville | EMAIL: dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]utk.edu 415 McClung Tower | (423) 974-6965 | FAX (423) 974-6926 Knoxville, TN 37996-0430 | See Webpage at http://ljp.la.utk.edu ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 6 May 1996 16:30:54 -0500 From: Donald Larmouth LARMOUTD[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]GBMS01.UWGB.EDU Subject: Re: Linguistic Autobiography As another McDavid student I used to use the "linguistic autobiography" assignment too, but I found they were usually long on family history and short on linguistic citations, and many of the latter seemed either cute or labored in an effort to be "interesting"--or they were very judgmental, hung up on "correctness." In recent years I've asked students to focus on a particular setting (part-time [or full-time] job, recreational group, hobby club, favorite hangouts, etc.) and characterize the usage of that group in that setting, especially in-group slang and jargon that would likely not be known to "outsiders." This has been quite productive and diminishes the privacy issue because it characterizes group conventions rather than idiosyncratic ones. For me this is an early assignment, not a late one--I like to try to get the students into an "observer mode" as soon as possible. As might be expected, the students are more comfortable picking out special terminology, idioms, acronyms, etc., and defining them--less comfortable trying to describe phonological features, "accents," etc. ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 6 May 1996 19:11:15 -0400 From: TERRY IRONS t.irons[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MOREHEAD-ST.EDU Subject: Ling Bio and Ellen Johnson I am excited by the assignment as Bethany describes it and plan to use it in the future. A recent comment said the assignment elicited too much about family and not enough about language. Why is that a problem? My colleagues in Rhet/Comp use a similar assignment that I have never found attractive. They ask students to write what they call a Literacy Narrative. I don't know the whole of the assignment, but I understand it is common in current comp pedagogy that has self-awareness and a Freirian agenda as its content. Students write a narrative about their development as writers. I have often looked on the idea with some envy, but have never really seen an appropriate context. The way Bethany describes the assignment may help me to find a context. On a side note, which was the real purpose of the e-missive, can anyone provide me with Ellen Johnson's current e-mail address? I understand she may be changing jobs (she took one before we could hire her!) and I need to contact her before she moves. Terry Irons (*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*) Terry Lynn Irons t.irons[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]morehead-st.edu Voice Mail: (606) 783-5164 Snail Mail: UPO 604 Morehead, KY 40351 (*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*) ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 5 May 1996 to 6 May 1996 ********************************************** There are 14 messages totalling 370 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. Ling Bio 2. SAMLA - ADS 3. RM - American Dialect Society 4. wh- at ny- ews from Texas? (2) 5. Ling Bio and Ellen Johnson (2) 6. Children's Lit Help 7. Linguistic Autobiography 8. Do REAL Texicans Say wh=[hw] & news=[njuz]? 9. More Texan-y Confessions 10. Speaking "country" 11. packy? 12. singular "we" ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Tue, 7 May 1996 07:43:02 -0400 From: "Bethany K. Dumas, U of Tennessee" dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UTKVX.UTK.EDU Subject: Re: Ling Bio Thank you for the feedback on ling bio assignments. I am excited by the assignment all over again! And I use it every year! I intend to become active in NCTE again, and it occurs to me that a session on ling bios might fit at a CCCC session sometime--is anyone else interested? How far in advance do we need to plan? I have not been active in NCTE for about fifteen years. What think you? Bethany Bethany K. Dumas, J.D., Ph.D. | Applied Linguistics, Language & Law Dep't of English, UT, Knoxville | EMAIL: dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]utk.edu 415 McClung Tower | (423) 974-6965 | FAX (423) 974-6926 Knoxville, TN 37996-0430 | See Webpage at http://ljp.la.utk.edu ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 7 May 1996 12:16:07 -0400 From: Allan Metcalf AAllan[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]AOL.COM Subject: SAMLA - ADS Dear Peter, Do you now have the program for the ADS session at SAMLA? If so, could you send me titles & authors (by e-mail, preferably) right away? I hope to send NADS to the printer by the end of the week. For the Sept issue, I'll also appreciate abstracts; but those can wait if they're not handy. Thanks a lot! I'll also be able to give your correct address! Best wishes - Allan ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 7 May 1996 12:16:11 -0400 From: Allan Metcalf AAllan[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]AOL.COM Subject: RM - American Dialect Society Dear Professor Huang: Thank you for the abstracts as well as the full program! Now I have everything I need for the ADS newsletter. Best wishes - Allan Metcalf ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 7 May 1996 12:16:15 -0400 From: Allan Metcalf AAllan[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]AOL.COM Subject: wh- at ny- ews from Texas? ADS member and cinema dialect coach Allyn Partin asks for information on the following in current Texas adult speech. ("Adult" meaning "grown up," not something else.) She wants to help certain actors sound Texan. 1. Is there a distinction between wh- and w- ? 2. Is there a [j] after the initial [n] in *news* etc? She is not e-connected, so I will note your answers and pass them on. Or, if you care to phone her directly (some of you know her), it's 818/361-0898. - Allan Metcalf, ADS executive secretary ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 7 May 1996 12:46:55 EST From: Boyd Davis FEN00BHD[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UNCCVM.UNCC.EDU Subject: Re: Ling Bio and Ellen Johnson A variation on the linguistic autobiography which has been positive and successful lately: students use notes from a prompted session on creating linguistic autobiography. The prompts begin with a 'talking world map' for current places where conversations are crucial, and go back in time via houseplan of early (and positive) Place. On this houseplan, they scribble notes identifying reading,writing,and variation in speech. Using a time- line, they identify peaks in their own lifeline for important language- awarenesses. This set of notes is written up into a two-page informal narrative which is the background section for the second part of the autobiography -- a close look at a restricted vocabulary they use (or used), which can be keyed to occupation, status, hobby, envisioned career, and the like. Some of the ones from this semester include how language changed when promoted to different jobs on a loading dock, what happened to left- over words from canal boats in a small town along the Erie canal, and how taking different dates to different restaurants (one preferred generic but fancy and the other loved authentic and local) meant handling menu-talk in order to Look Suave The prompting eliminates the need for models, and they find themselves suddenly interested in word-formation and processes of change, etc. I've had good fortune with every variation, so I agree with Bethany and Jeutonne ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 7 May 1996 14:41:58 -0400 From: "Bethany K. Dumas, U of Tennessee" dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UTKVX.UTK.EDU Subject: Re: Ling Bio and Ellen Johnson On Tue, 7 May 1996, Boyd Davis wrote: A variation on the linguistic autobiography which has been positive and successful lately: students use notes from a prompted session on creating linguistic autobiography. The prompts begin with a 'talking world map' for current places where conversations are crucial, and go back in time via houseplan ... Sounds interesting. I'd like to know more: who does the "prompting"? what is the 'talking world map' like? Is there something in print I can read? Thanks, Bethany Bethany K. Dumas, J.D., Ph.D. | Applied Linguistics, Language & Law Dep't of English, UT, Knoxville | EMAIL: dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]utk.edu 415 McClung Tower | (423) 974-6965 | FAX (423) 974-6926 Knoxville, TN 37996-0430 | See Webpage at http://ljp.la.utk.edu ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 7 May 1996 14:48:35 -0400 From: Bob Haas rahaas[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]HAMLET.UNCG.EDU Subject: Children's Lit Help ADS Folken, While this isn't the proper forum for this question, I hope that some of you might know where to forward it. I'm trying to find a book that I read when I was eight years old; I cannot recall the name. It's about a boy who receives a gift from an extraterrestrial. I don't remember his name, but I have the notion that he was a cross between Klaatu and Ward Cleaver. Anyway, he gives this kid a ball that will do anything the boy wills it to. Pretty cool, eh? If you can help me with the title, I'll be most grateful. I'm guessing that it was published in the mid to late 50s. Bob ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 7 May 1996 14:52:53 -0500 From: Katherine Catmull kate[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]BGA.COM Subject: Re: wh- at ny- ews from Texas? On Tue, 7 May 1996, Allan Metcalf wrote: ADS member and cinema dialect coach Allyn Partin asks for information on the following in current Texas adult speech. ("Adult" meaning "grown up," not something else.) She wants to help certain actors sound Texan. The answers to both these questions depend on what part of Texas the person is from (or trying to sound like they're from), the character's rural-ness or urban-ity, etc. That said-- 1. Is there a distinction between wh- and w- ? Last year a dialect coach told me that "texas" is one of the few places to preserve this distinction. I was suspicious, but shortly afterwards began to hear it in the speech of people with strong West Texas and South Texas drawls. For whatever that's worth. I still don't hear it much in the faster, more nasal East Texas speech. 2. Is there a [j] after the initial [n] in *news* etc? This sounds more East Texas-y to me. Sorry this obviously very informal. I once read the difference between West and East Texas accents described in terms of two men then running for Texas governor: Maaawk Whahht (Mark White) and Chim Maedix (Jim Maddox). The latter is particularly _nasal_. I guess it depends on whether the character is meant to sound like a classic cowboy or Ross Perot. Kate Catmull kate[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]bga.com ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 7 May 1996 16:52:54 -0400 From: Jeutonne Brewer jpbrewer[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]HAMLET.UNCG.EDU Subject: Re: Linguistic Autobiography I also prefer not to stress a model too much. This essay was an assigned reading in one of their textbooks, so it made sense to use it as one possible example. Perhaps I was just lucky because the students did not slavishly follow the example. I also talked with the students about different ways in which they could organize their essays. I don't use previous students' essays for this assignment or any othrs because I think students do tend to think of that example as the only successful example. ************************************************** * jpbrewer[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]hamlet.uncg.edu * * Jeutonne_Brewer[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uncg.edu * * Jeutonne P. Brewer * * Department of English * * University of North Carolina at Greensboro * * Greensboro, NC 27412 * ************************************************** ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 7 May 1996 16:26:25 -0600 From: Samuel Jones smjones1[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]FACSTAFF.WISC.EDU Subject: Re: Do REAL Texicans Say wh=[hw] & news=[njuz]? ADS member and cinema dialect coach Allyn Partin asks for information on the following in current Texas adult speech. ("Adult" meaning "grown up," not something else.) She wants to help certain actors sound Texan. ______________________________________________________________________ I am originally from Oklahoma, but I lived and taught in the eastern part of Texas for about 5 years, although I also spent a considerable amout of time in and around Brownwood, Texas--"West"-Central Texas, after my parents moved there. 1. Is there a distinction between wh- and w- ? During the years I lived in eastern-southern Oklahoma, there was a CLEAR distinction made. In those years I taught in East Texas, some 45 years ago!, the same CLEAR distinction between [hw] & [w] was also made. Along Texas' southern coastal plain, I sensed that this difference was NOT always observed, although this is nothing more than my impression. I suspect that usage varies widely within the state, depending to some extent on the language traditions and characteristics of both original settlers and of those who subsequently settled throughout the different areas of the state, even creating linguistics pockets. The "Piney Woods" of East Texas are far different from the "twang" of Abilene or from the somewhat softer, easier vowels of a place like Temple, Texas. 2. Is there a [j] after the initial [n] in *news* etc? I found the transitory "i" = IPA [j] to be broadly distributed throughout the North, the Central and the Eastern parts of Texas, as in [njuz] or [njuz-pe-pr]. It is also found in suit=[sjut] & [sjut-kes]. There is in many Southern areas a perhaps slightly less clear but still easily-distinguishable [j] in a word like shoes=[shjuz]. smjones __________________________________________________________________________ She is not e-connected, so I will note your answers and pass them on. Or, if you care to phone her directly (some of you know her), it's 818/361-0898. - Allan Metcalf, ADS executive secretary ____________________________________________________________________________ DR. SAMUEL M. JONES INTERNET: smjones1[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]facstaff.wisc.edu Prof. of Music & Latin American Studies TELNET: samjones[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]macc.wisc.edu 5434 Humanities Building FAX: 608 + 262-8876 (UW) 455 North Park Street __________________________________________ University of Wisconsin-Madison TELEPHONES: 608 + 263-1900 (UW-Lv. message) Madison, WI 53706-1483 * 608 + 263-1924 * (UW-Office - * VOICE MAIL--Lv message) ____________________________________________________________________________ "Pen-y-Bryn" TELEPHONES: 608 + 233-2150 (Home) 122 Shepard Terrace 608 + 233-4748 (Home) Madison, WI 53705-3614 ____________________________________________________________________________ ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 7 May 1996 17:44:57 -0400 From: "Bethany K. Dumas, U of Tennessee" dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UTKVX.UTK.EDU Subject: More Texan-y Confessions [The ff-ing data are self-reported by a Caucasion female, aged 59, who was born in Corpus Christi, TX, and spent her formative years (well, the first ones) in southeast Texas.] Now that you know about "wash rag," you might as well know about /hw-/ and /s, t, d, n + glide/: 1. /hw-/ I am a native speaker of /hw-/, though I have learned to style-shift in recent decades. My mother (80, southeast TX) speaks /hw-/ and does not style-shift. I once heard Gary Underwood (is he still in Austin?) say that he did not understand the Mickey Mouse Theme Song until he took a linguistics course from Harold Allen at Minn. Gary grew up in Clay County, ARK (the "white delta") and when he heard /wai/ he heard "Y" NOT "why." 2. /s, t, d, n + glide/ I am also a native speaker of /s, t, d, n + glide/, as in student, tune, dew, and news. But even as a child, I could (and did) say, "Put up your /duks/," and I have style-shifted ever since I went to Chicago: On that trip to Chicago when I got the idea for the ling autobiography from RIM, I also astounded a roomful of linguists and linguistic students at IIT when I said the word /nyuz/. I don't think anyone in the room except me had ever heard anyone actually pronounce the glide in that context except as an exercise in a linguistics class. Larry Davis was there, I think, but I'm not sure who else. However, I do not have an affricate in such words as tulip, and that's not uncommon in East Tennessee. Boyd, you wanna prompt me while I plan my ling autobiography? The time line will take a while to construct, but there's lots of stuff to report. So am I a "classic cowboy or Ross Perot"? I don't think so -- more like Molly Ivins, who reminds me of my cousin Patsy (southeast TX, about five years older than me). But I don't know where Molly is from. Now I'll hush and go grade papers. Bethany Bethany K. Dumas, J.D., Ph.D. | Applied Linguistics, Language & Law Dep't of English, UT, Knoxville | EMAIL: dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]utk.edu 415 McClung Tower | (423) 974-6965 | FAX (423) 974-6926 Knoxville, TN 37996-0430 | See Webpage at http://ljp.la.utk.edu ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 7 May 1996 19:03:04 -0500 From: Dan Goodman goodman[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]FREENET.MSP.MN.US Subject: Speaking "country" There's at least one singer whose "country" accent is thicker when she speaks than when she sings: Nanci Griffith. Not incidentally, country recordings from _very_ early (the 1920's) mostly have a rather different accent than what's now considered "country." To me, it sounds more lowland Southern and less "Hillbilly." (However, I'm not a trained observer. I don't even play one on television.) Dan Goodman ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 7 May 1996 23:24:20 EST From: Boyd Davis FEN00BHD[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UNCCVM.UNCC.EDU Subject: packy? What does 'packy' mean in this context? Late that next afternoon, I found Det. Lt. Royce Whitlock of the state police where he usually went for lunch on his days off: downstairs in the basement of a thriving cement-block mini-mall in Lynnfield--convenience store selling milk, cigarettes, potato chips, and lottery scratch cards and keno tickets that kept a bunch of older guys in satin jackets rapt in front of a TV screen; two-chair barber shop; sewing supplies store; packy; and a take-out sandwich shop. --George V. Higgins, Sandra Nichols Found Dead. New York: Henry Holt,1996 ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 7 May 1996 22:53:04 -0500 From: Dan Goodman goodman[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]FREENET.MSP.MN.US Subject: singular "we" In the Twin Cities area, one common equivalent of goodbye is "We'll see you." A couple years ago, I began to notice how often this was used when the "we" was one person. Most of the people I've heard saying this whose backgrounds I know come from the Twin Cities or rural Minnesota. But one grew up in North Carolina. I wonder if this is found elsewhere in the Upper Midwest? Dan Goodman ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 6 May 1996 to 7 May 1996 ********************************************** There are 11 messages totalling 197 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. Stereotyping Texans 2. singular "we" 3. packy? (2) 4. More Texan-y Confessions 5. my address 6. maestra? 7. temporary shut-down (2) 8. Abstracts for Methods IX (2) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Wed, 8 May 1996 00:10:08 -0700 From: Rudy Troike RTROIKE[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU Subject: Stereotyping Texans One might say, "Here we go again". There are of course many different kinds of Texans, and all of the linguistic maps make clear that East Texas is different from Central Texas is different from West Texas, and the Rio Grande Valley, where the purest English is spoken, is a world unto itself. So, who or what "sounds like a Texan"? For this Texan, there is emphatically a /y/ after /t/, /d/, and /n/ before /uw/ in words like Tuesday, due, and news, but I was saddened to note Jim Lehrer the other night saying /nuwz/ instead of /nyuwz/. A few years back when I was at UT, I regularly polled classes on the /hw/:/w/ contrast, and found it at about 50%. So half do and half don't, and all are Texans. I'm embarrassed to admit that I don't have the distinction, though my mother does. But then my greatest linguistic handicap at UT was not "sounding like a Texan". So, is a puzzlement. ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 8 May 1996 05:31:17 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Re: singular "we" I wonder if this is found elsewhere in the Upper Midwest? I thought singular "we" as in "we'll see you" was pretty common throughout the U.S. I've heard it compared with the use of "y'all" in set expressions like "y'all come back" when said to just one person. I think maybe Michael Montgomery has made such a comparison in one of his articles on "y'all." --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 8 May 1996 06:55:56 -0400 From: "M. Lynne Murphy" 104LYN[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MUSE.ARTS.WITS.AC.ZA Subject: Re: packy? Late that next afternoon, I found Det. Lt. Royce Whitlock of the state police where he usually went for lunch on his days off: downstairs in the basement of a thriving cement-block mini-mall in Lynnfield--convenience store selling milk, cigarettes, potato chips, and lottery scratch cards and keno tickets that kept a bunch of older guys in satin jackets rapt in front of a TV screen; two-chair barber shop; sewing supplies store; packy; and a take-out sandwich shop. --George V. Higgins, Sandra Nichols Found Dead. New York: Henry Holt,1996 a packy, in most of massachusetts (that i know of), is a liquor store. more formally, a 'package store'. (this has something to do w/ liquor selling laws in massachusetts, but i don't know what.) don't know if it's spread to other parts of new england. _packy_ was definitely the most dominant term for liquor store in western mass when i lived there in the early-mid 80s. (i spent most of my time there in a umass dorm, so the packy was a frequent topic of conversation.) a "packy run" is a trip to the liquor store (to stock up). cheers, lynne --------------------------------------------------------------------- M. Lynne Murphy 104lyn[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]muse.arts.wits.ac.za Department of Linguistics phone: 27(11)716-2340 University of the Witwatersrand fax: 27(11)716-8030 Johannesburg 2050 SOUTH AFRICA ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 8 May 1996 09:27:22 -0500 From: Katherine Catmull kate[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]BGA.COM Subject: Re: More Texan-y Confessions So am I a "classic cowboy or Ross Perot"? I don't think so -- more like I'm the one who brought up this "cowboy vs. Perot" business, and I'm realizing I should have made clear that I just meant these as easily accessible examples of perhaps the two most distinct dialects in Texas. Of course there are many more. I was just trying to give the dialect coach a sense of how drastically different Texas accents can be. Kate Catmull kate[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]bga.com ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 8 May 1996 10:22:10 -0600 From: Ellen Johnson EJOHNSON[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MSUVX1.MEMPHIS.EDU Subject: my address It is rather unsettling to see your own name in the topic headings in your mailbox. For anybody who cares (and there are many of you who do and who have been great supporters during my job search), here's the 411: I will be moving to Bowling Green, KY in August to take a tenure-track job in the English Dept teaching mostly linguistics (Western Kentucky University). Yeah!!!:-) For the next three months my address will remain ejohnson[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]cc.memphis.edu I will not be teaching this summer, but will be doing an independent study on field methods with 2 students and working part-time at the Mississippi River Museum and dabbling at painting and other creative endeavors. I should have more time for e-mail too. Ellen ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 8 May 1996 10:40:17 -0600 From: Ellen Johnson EJOHNSON[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MSUVX1.MEMPHIS.EDU Subject: maestra? Anyone care to take up this question (culled from another list)? Ellen Anyway, it's fun talking about it. We have a "Master" here with our symphony. She is JoAnn Falletta. She is called "Maestro" but shouldn't she be called "Mistress?" Or perhaps with a feminine ending to the Italian..."Maestra." ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 8 May 1996 14:23:31 -0400 From: Ronald Butters amspeech[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ACPUB.DUKE.EDU Subject: temporary shut-down How do I turn off this list for two weeks while I'm off in Italy? ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 8 May 1996 14:22:16 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Re: temporary shut-down How do I turn off this list for two weeks while I'm off in Italy? Send this command to listserv[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uga.cc.uga.edu: set ads-l nomail Be sure to send it from the address your mail comes to -- in your case the Duke address, not the AOL address. The AOL address is already on 'nomail'. I trust that anybody who has run into problems with our change to "send=private" has let me know. But only two or three people have. I'm hoping that the new version of listserv with an improved spam filter will be out before too much longer and we can go back to "send=public." --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) P.S. When you want to start getting mail again after setting 'nomail', the command is 'set ads-l mail'. ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 8 May 1996 15:43:13 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Abstracts for Methods IX Thanks to Allan, full abstracts of the fifty papers to be presented at Methods IX in Wales this summer are now available from the ADS web pages and from anonymous ftp. To get them on the web, go to http://www.msstate. edu/Archives/ADS/meetings.html and click on "Abstracts...." To get them via anonymous ftp, go to ftp.msstate.edu and look in pub/archives/ADS/Files for a file named methods.txt. In spite of some slight clutter like "=" at the end of each line, the online abstracts are easily readable. --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 8 May 1996 15:49:55 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Re: Abstracts for Methods IX I just added a copy on gopher also: gopher.msstate.edu -- #3 from first menu, #1 from second menu, #3 from third menu. Btw, do any of you ever use the ADS ftp files? It has occurred to me that these days with most people using the web and occasionally gopher, it may be that the ftp files are a waste of space. --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 8 May 1996 20:06:12 -0700 From: William King WFKING[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU Subject: Re: packy? It could be a "Package Store" in New England. Differentiated from a tavern/bar. Conn. or Mass.? ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 7 May 1996 to 8 May 1996 ********************************************** There are 17 messages totalling 404 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. packy? (5) 2. Words that end in GRY (5) 3. out-of-pocket (6) 4. RE out-of-pocket ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Thu, 9 May 1996 00:26:58 -0400 From: ALICE FABER faber[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]HASKINS.YALE.EDU Subject: Re: packy? From Lynn Murphy: | | Late that next afternoon, I found Det. Lt. Royce Whitlock of the state police | where he usually went for lunch on his days off: downstairs in the basement | of a thriving cement-block mini-mall in Lynnfield--convenience store selling | milk, cigarettes, potato chips, and lottery scratch cards and keno tickets | that kept a bunch of older guys in satin jackets rapt in front of a TV | screen; two-chair barber shop; sewing supplies store; packy; and a take-out | sandwich shop. | --George V. Higgins, Sandra Nichols Found Dead. New York: Henry Holt,1996 | | a packy, in most of massachusetts (that i know of), is a liquor | store. more formally, a 'package store'. (this has something to do | w/ liquor selling laws in massachusetts, but i don't know what.) | don't know if it's spread to other parts of new england. | | _packy_ was definitely the most dominant term for liquor store in | western mass when i lived there in the early-mid 80s. (i spent most | of my time there in a umass dorm, so the packy was a frequent topic of | conversation.) a "packy run" is a trip to the liquor store (to stock | up). From William King: | | It could be a "Package Store" in New England. Differentiated from a | tavern/bar. Conn. or Mass.? Well, I'm familiar with package store, but I can't recall whether I knew the term before I moved to Connecticut. I've never heard "packy" down here in South Central CT, though. I'll ask my sister (who lives up by the Mass border); it will liven up her office, I'm sure, if they've gotten over her attempts to pin down the _aunt_ /ant/-/aent/ isogloss. (By the way, she's *not* a linguist...) Alice Faber faber[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]haskins.yale.edu ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 9 May 1996 07:38:16 EST From: simon[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CVAX.IPFW.INDIANA.EDU Subject: Re: packy? Okay, I thought it was a primitive video arcade, with a pac man or two. beth ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 9 May 1996 08:41:37 EDT From: Larry Horn LHORN[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]YALEVM.CIS.YALE.EDU Subject: Re: packy? To support Alice's intuition, I can confirm that 'package store' is standard here but 'packy' inextant. Of course, it's hard to know that a form REALLY doesn't occur, but I've never encountered it in 15 years in the same South- Central Connecticut regional area as Alice's. I also don't remember 'packy' from a couple of years spent in Mass. in the '70's, but I do recall that 'package store' is somehow MORE standard there than here, although here it's used interchangeably with liquor store. People I know always opt for the latter unregional variant. Of course not all liquor stores are package stores: Warehouse Liquors, Liquor Land, etc.--the ones that are more like supermarkets --are not package stores (much less packies). Oh, if you were wondering, we don't call them 'lickies' either. Larry ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 9 May 1996 09:21:52 -0400 From: "M. Lynne Murphy" 104LYN[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MUSE.ARTS.WITS.AC.ZA Subject: Re: packy? larry said: To support Alice's intuition, I can confirm that 'package store' is standard here but 'packy' inextant. Of course, it's hard to know that a form REALLY doesn't occur, but I've never encountered it in 15 years in the same South- Central Connecticut regional area as Alice's. I also don't remember 'packy' from a couple of years spent in Mass. in the '70's, but I do recall that 'package store' is somehow MORE standard there than here, although here it's well, either "packy" is a later development, or maybe it's college slang rather than general usage. i swear, when i lived there, nobody i knew used "package store" in normal conversations. maybe we were more affectionate toward the package store (and its contents and services) than average bay staters. lynne --------------------------------------------------------------------- M. Lynne Murphy 104lyn[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]muse.arts.wits.ac.za Department of Linguistics phone: 27(11)716-2340 University of the Witwatersrand fax: 27(11)716-8030 Johannesburg 2050 SOUTH AFRICA ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 9 May 1996 06:50:49 PDT From: "//www.usa.net/~ague" ague[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]REDRCK.ENET.DEC.COM Subject: Words that end in GRY In the past few weeks I've seen this unanswered puzzler pop up in three different circles. So excuse me while I introduce it to this circle which might be able to answer it. The English language has (at least) three words that end in GRY. "Angry" and "hungry" are two of them. What is the third, which purportedly is an everyday word? -- Jim ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 9 May 1996 09:09:37 CDT From: "Halsted M. Bernard" ZU05756[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UABDPO.DPO.UAB.EDU Subject: Re: Words that end in GRY It's not an everyday word... whoever told you that was... well. If they use it everyday, I'd like to shake their hand. :) The other word besides 'angry' and 'hungry' is: 'maugry' 'maugre' is still in our dictionaries today... it's Archaic: 'in spite of.' I have no idea about 'maugry.' I know this only because someone gave me this puzzle a year ago and it made me crazy till he told me the answer. Hope you are saved some craziness. _'sted._ ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 9 May 1996 11:18:23 -0400 From: "David Bergdahl (614) 593-2783" BERGDAHL[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]OUVAXA.CATS.OHIOU.EDU Subject: Re: Words that end in GRY One of the few uses for a rhyming dictionary is finding responses to questions such as words that end in -gry! ________________________________________________________________________ David Bergdahl tel: (614) 593-2783 fax: (614) 593-2818 Bergdahl[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]OUVAXA.CaTS.OHIOU.EDU Ohio University/Athens "Where Appalachia meets the Midwest"--Anya Briggs ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 9 May 1996 10:38:50 -0400 From: Jesse T Sheidlower jester[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]PANIX.COM Subject: Re: Words that end in GRY In the past few weeks I've seen this unanswered puzzler pop up in three different circles. So excuse me while I introduce it to this circle which might be able to answer it. The English language has (at least) three words that end in GRY. "Angry" and "hungry" are two of them. What is the third, which purportedly is an everyday word? AAAAaaaaargh! Does _every corner_ of the Internet have to be saturated with this? The answer to the riddle in the form you heard it (as opposed to the form you're quoting) is either "what" or "three." It's a shaggy-dog riddle. ("There are three words..." the question begins, and when the question asks "what is the third word?" it's really asking "what is the third word of the riddle?" Alternately, the question is asked earlier in the riddle, and then the last line is "'What' is the word.", declaratively--this version only works when heard orally.) As for words that end in -gry, there are a whole bunch, none of them common, including puggry, maugry, iggry, aggry, gry, and others, but the best is _nugry,_ coined on rec.games.puzzles to mean 'the sort of person who will ask the words ending in -gry question without checking to see if five billion people have already asked it here before'. JTS ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 9 May 1996 10:56:34 EDT From: Larry Horn LHORN[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]YALEVM.CIS.YALE.EDU Subject: Re: Words that end in GRY According to our handy departmental reverse dictionary, our only -gry word besides 'angry' and 'hungry' is 'aggry'. An aggry bead (from the Edo, accord- ing to Webster) is a variegated glass bead found buried in the earth in Ghana and England, which strikes me as an odd natural class of places for glass beads to be found buried in the earth of. In any case, a 'common, everyday word' aggry isn't. Maybe there's another one the reverse dictionary missed. Any "gry-gry" (wo)men out there? Larry ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 9 May 1996 11:13:19 -0500 From: "David A. Johns" daj000[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]FOX.WAY.PEACHNET.EDU Subject: Re: packy? When I was growing up in Berkshire County in the 50s and early 60s, "package store" was the normal, term, and, I'm inclined to think, the only one. At least I remember at some point thinking that "liquor store" was a bit blunt, and this was probably when I left the area in '66. I've never heard "packy" -- my first reaction, influenced by the voices I hear around me now, was that it meant tobacco. David Johns ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 9 May 1996 16:10:35 -0600 From: "Gregory J. Pulliam" gpulliam[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CHARLIE.ACC.IIT.EDU Subject: out-of-pocket My father from Hannibal, Missouri tells me of a dispute he's involved in regarding the term out-of-pocket. He and my mother, who's from Omaha, NE, use the term to mean "not being where one is supposed to be," as in "I'm sorry we couldn't be there but we were out-of-pocket." A friend of his uses the term to mean "out-of money." My wife and I use the term to mean "unexpected and immediate cash" expenses. Does anybody have any dialect region inoformation about these terms, or other supporting or diverging uses? Greg Pulliam gpulliam[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]charlie.iit.edu Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 9 May 1996 17:34:29 -0400 From: "H Stephen Straight (Binghamton University, SUNY)" sstraigh[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]BINGSUNS.CC.BINGHAMTON.EDU Subject: Re: out-of-pocket The only use of out-of-pocket in my active vocabulary is to refer to expenses incurred in the course of doing the boss's job for which an employee may or may not receive reimbursement. In other words, a gift or loan of money to get one's job done. Some hypothetical (i.e. fabricated) examples: "You'll have to be out-of-pocket for that until you submit your receipt." "You don't expect me to cover a flight to Beijing as an out-of-pocket expense, do you?" "The only way to avoid out-of-pocket purchase is to put in for a travel advance, but that takes a minimum of a month." "I wish I could charge interest on my out-of-pocket balances." I've heard out-of-pocket used in other ways but have never quite been able to sort them out. Greg Pulliam's posting makes me understand why. H. Stephen STRAIGHT - Linguistic Biodata - for research use only Born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, 15 May 1943. Childhood caregivers all small-town Michigan-bred advance-degreed college English teachers (egad!). Early years (age 2-7) in downstate Illinois (Lincoln). Critical years in Chicago (Hyde Park, age 7-14) and Oak Park (age 14-18), Illinois--summers in Ann Arbor, MI. [Studied French, age 15-18.] College in Ann Arbor (age 18-22)--U Michigan BA in English & American Literature. [Studied French two years, German one year.] Graduate school in Chicago (age 22-27)--U Chicago MA and PhD in linguistics. [Received High Pass on Chicago's French and German graduate reading exams; studied Japanese for two academic quarters, Yucatec Maya for one year, Spanish for two months.] Lived one year (age 25-26) in Yucatan, Mexico. [Spoke Spanish and Yucatec Maya daily; lectured in Spanish to a (forgiving) university audience.] Ever since (age 27- ) in upstate New York--professing linguistics and anthropology at Binghamton U (SUNY). Lived one year (age 36-37) in Bucharest, Romania. [Spoke Romanian a little bit every day (studied semi-formally for about four months), French briefly every week.] Lived sixth months (age 52-53) in Washington, DC. ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 9 May 1996 16:52:11 -0500 From: Tom Beckner TMBECKNER[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]TAYLORU.EDU Subject: Re: out-of-pocket Living in Georgia for several years, I often heard this term to mean something similar to the usage your mother describes. It means "not available." ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 9 May 1996 17:45:59 +0000 From: Grant Barrett gbarrett[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]JERRYNET.COM Subject: RE out-of-pocket I'm also from Missouri, and I find "out of pocket" generally means "unpla= nned" and is most often used in referring to money. "Unplanned" or "unexp= ected" work in a general way in both your parents' uses, I think, though = not as direct synonyms for "out of pocket".=20 Your parents might say "I'm sorry we couldn't be there because we were in= an unexpected place". Your friend might say "Those additional charges ar= e for unexpected costs". Unfortunately, I get the idea that "out of pocket" is one of those terms = that has been used in one way so long that it will in the end only be use= d to describe unexpected or unplanned expenses.=20 -------------------------------------- Date: 5/9/96 5:31 PM To: Grant Barrett From: Gregory J. Pulliam My father from Hannibal, Missouri tells me of a dispute he's involved in regarding the term out-of-pocket. He and my mother, who's from Omaha, NE= , use the term to mean "not being where one is supposed to be," as in "I'm sorry we couldn't be there but we were out-of-pocket." A friend of his uses the term to mean "out-of money." My wife and I use the term to mean "unexpected and immediate cash" expenses. Does anybody have any dialect region inoformation about these terms, or other supporting or diverging uses? Greg Pulliam gpulliam[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]charlie.iit.edu Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 9 May 1996 17:13:20 PDT From: Duane Campbell dcamp[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]EPIX.NET Subject: Re: out-of-pocket --- On Thu, 9 May 1996 16:10:35 -0600 "Gregory J. Pulliam" gpulliam[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CHARLIE.ACC.IIT.EDU wrote: My father from Hannibal, Missouri tells me of a dispute he's involved in regarding the term out-of-pocket. He and my mother, who's from Omaha, NE, use the term to mean "not being where one is supposed to be," Here in Pennsylvania I can think of three different ways out-of-pocket is used, none of which (is? are?) the same as your father's. 1. A casual expense. If you run a business, most payments are made by check from an invoice, but there are always small out-of-pocket expenses. 2. An expense you pay for which you expect to be reimbursed. If you run an errand for someone, you'd be reimbursed for your out-of-pocket expenses. 3. As an adjective modifying a person, meaning he got stuck. He may have expected to get reimbursed, but he ended up out-of-pocket. RE: my confusion with "none" above. What is the proper verb form for a subject that is neither singular nor plural? Singular means one. Plural means more than one. "None" is neither. Does usage vary from region to region? ------------------------------------- Duane Campbell dcamp[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]epix.net In the beginning the Earth was without form and void. Why didn't they leave well enough alone? ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 9 May 1996 17:41:27 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Re: out-of-pocket The only use of out-of-pocket in my active vocabulary is to refer to expenses incurred in the course of doing the boss's job for which an employee may or may not receive reimbursement. In other words, a gift or With this meaning, I find that it's usually in an attributive slot, preceding a noun like "expenses." In my experience, "out of pocket" as a predicate adjective nearly always refers to a person and means something like "not around at the moment." --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 9 May 1996 21:15:31 -0400 From: "Bethany K. Dumas, U of Tennessee" dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UTKVX.UTK.EDU Subject: Re: out-of-pocket On Thu, 9 May 1996, Gregory J. Pulliam asked about regional variation in the meaning of out-of-pocket. I have always used it to mean "not being where one is supposed to be" or "so crazy-busy I just couldn't make it." I have never heard it used to mean out of money. Bethany, who can always use a new term for being out of cash Bethany K. Dumas, J.D., Ph.D. | Applied Linguistics, Language & Law Dep't of English, UT, Knoxville | EMAIL: dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]utk.edu 415 McClung Tower | (423) 974-6965 | FAX (423) 974-6926 Knoxville, TN 37996-0430 | See Webpage at http://ljp.la.utk.edu ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 8 May 1996 to 9 May 1996 ********************************************** There are 14 messages totalling 321 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. out-of-pocket (5) 2. singular 'we' 3. a completely unangry response.. (2) 4. words in -gry 5. new word? (2) 6. English Only Amendment (3) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Fri, 10 May 1996 05:41:23 -0400 From: "M. Lynne Murphy" 104LYN[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MUSE.ARTS.WITS.AC.ZA Subject: Re: out-of-pocket The only use of out-of-pocket in my active vocabulary is to refer to expenses incurred in the course of doing the boss's job for which an employee may or may not receive reimbursement. In other words, a gift or With this meaning, I find that it's usually in an attributive slot, preceding a noun like "expenses." In my experience, "out of pocket" as a predicate adjective nearly always refers to a person and means something like "not around at the moment." --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) the "expenses" meaning is the only one i have, but it's not just pre- nominal. it can be used adverbially, as in "we paid for the refreshments out-of-pocket." lynne --------------------------------------------------------------------- M. Lynne Murphy 104lyn[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]muse.arts.wits.ac.za Department of Linguistics phone: 27(11)716-2340 University of the Witwatersrand fax: 27(11)716-8030 Johannesburg 2050 SOUTH AFRICA ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 10 May 1996 15:36:19 GMT From: ****** walker[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MONZA.U-STRASBG.FR Subject: singular 'we' This seems to be similar to a British use, such us ' Give us a hand', or 'Can you lend us 5 pounds', which are very common, in pretty much most dialects, certainly in England (I'm English myself) and practically always refer to an individual. I'm wondering whether there is some kind of link between these phenomena. Jim Walker Universite de Strasbourg ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 10 May 1996 09:39:53 -0600 From: Joan Houston Hall jdhall[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]FACSTAFF.WISC.EDU Subject: Re: out-of-pocket DARE will have an entry for "out of (the) pocket" in volume IV (at "pocket"). It's labelled "chiefly Sth, S Midl" and defined 'Unavailable, absent, out of place.' We have quite a few contemporary examples, but nothing earlier than the late 1960s. So if anyone can come up with an earlier citation, or even a recollection of the use of the phrase before that, I'd like to see it. This usually refers to people rather than things, occurring in contexts such as "I called you at home yesterday, but you were out of pocket." "I'm out of the pocket for a bit, but will get back at ya." "I'll be out of pocket for a few days, but you can leave a message on my machine." Joan Hall DARE ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 10 May 1996 10:06:20 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Re: out-of-pocket place.' We have quite a few contemporary examples, but nothing earlier than the late 1960s. So if anyone can come up with an earlier citation, or even a recollection of the use of the phrase before that, I'd like to see it. I would be surprised to learn that it didn't exist before the '60s, but I don't trust my memory enough to swear that I used it or heard it before then. It "feels" like an expression I've known all my life. --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) born in Jackson, Mississippi, in 1943 ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 10 May 1996 11:07:09 -0400 From: Bryan Gick bryan.gick[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]YALE.EDU Subject: a completely unangry response.. According to our handy departmental reverse dictionary, our only -gry word besides 'angry' and 'hungry' is 'aggry'. An aggry bead (from the Edo, accord- Larry Ok. I feel inspired to (vainly attempt to) do away once and for all with this annoying question - in a way appropriate to the kind of list we're meeting on. If the "riddle" answer of "WHAT" is truly the "intended" answer, then I feel nothing but malice for its creator(s). The application, though, of some creative morpholog(r?)y is a pretty satisfying way of supering it. The way I've seen the question put is: There are 3 words in the english language that end with "GRY". One is HUNGRY and one of them is ANGRY. What is the third word ? If you have listened very closely I have already told you the 3rd word. ..in that case, the answer is "UNANGRY" (see header :) ) Also acceptable (if less frequently used), therefore, is "UNHUNGRY." Another handy affix is the "-y" ending, giving us "OGRY" (not to be confused with "ogrish"). N.B.: This works only inasmuch as the "-y" ending is a productive one in English (it certainly is for me..in the last week I've heard: "This shake is very banana-y," and "This table is more desky than.." Not to mention the subject heading of "Texan-y" on this very list the day before yesterday). [A QUESTION: I have, though, noticed some dialecty variation in the acceptabiliy of the -y suffix. Anybody know more??? BG] The rest of the examples all use the many "-ry" endings. This is a pretty productive ending in English, if kind of low profile. It can have lots of meanings: (a) collective quality; (b) act, art or occupation; (c) place; (d) aggregate; (e) occupation-specific equipment/materials; etc. From these, we get such possibilities as (some work better than others): (a) striplingry (childishness) nidderingry (foolishness.. cf. foolery, etc.) (b) glazingry (the craft, art, etc., of glass-making) mortgagry (c) glazingry (a glass factory) sneeshingry (a snuffery) wildingry (a fruit tree farm) carriagry (a carriage manufacturer's) (d) eveningry (cf. finery, plumery...) (e) fowlingry (the stuff, knowledge, etc, used in/for birding) plumbingry fishingry whalingry huntingry etc.. My apologies for adding to the heap. Bryan /\---------------------------------------------------------- [AT SYMBOL GOES HERE][AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]|Bryan Gick Department of Linguistics bgick[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]minerva.cis.yale.edu Yale University '/ and Haskins Laboratories W----------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 10 May 1996 11:10:08 EST From: Boyd Davis FEN00BHD[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UNCCVM.UNCC.EDU Subject: Re: out-of-pocket Like Natalie, I also "feel" that I've heard this all my life, but never in collocations with people, only re. expenses. Boyd Davis, born 1940 Louisville Ky, in NC since 1961. ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 10 May 1996 10:27:04 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Re: out-of-pocket Like Natalie, I also "feel" that I've heard this all my life, but never in collocations with people, only re. expenses. I didn't mean to include the re expenses meaning when I said I felt that I'd known it all my life. I meant only in the sense of "I tried to find John, but he seems to be out-of-pocket." I am pretty sure that I knew that meaning long before I ever heard about "out-of-pocket expenses." That, of course, may say nothing about which one was around first. I wasn't as likely to be thinking about out-of-pocket expenses as a child or teenager as I was about whether John might be out-of-pocket when I was looking for him. --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 10 May 1996 10:50:12 -0500 From: Dennis Baron debaron[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UIUC.EDU Subject: words in -gry Thanks to Jesse's comments on the -gry phenom. My secretary asked me about that just this week, and I've seen it come up on alt.usage.english recently as well. I never realized it was a riddle--never really paid that much attention to it, just assuming it was one of these recurring urban legend type things. Now I'll know what to say when I'm asked. Maugry, btw, from Frnech malgre', no, via AN? Dennis Dennis Baron debaron[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uiuc.edu Department of English office: 217-333-2392 University of Illinois fax: 217-333-4321 608 S. Wright Street home: 217-384-1683 Urbana, IL 61801 ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 10 May 1996 12:12:47 -0400 From: David Muschell dmuschel[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MAIL.GAC.PEACHNET.EDU Subject: new word? I recently received a post inviting all technophobes to join "Luddites On-Line." Now, not only is it a bit strange for an anti-technology group to have its own homepage, but within the message was this line: "Our user-friendly graphic interface allows you to discuss strategies for undermining the growing cybourgeoisie..." Have any of you heard of "cybourgeoisie" (the word, of course--we probably _are_ the labeled group)? David ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 10 May 1996 10:50:49 -0700 From: "Thomas L. Clark" tlc[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]NEVADA.EDU Subject: English Only Amendment A petition has just been filed in Nevada to pass an English Only amendment. If you live in one of the twenty-six states which currently have such a law, please write to me about the changes (for good or ill) that have taken place in your state since the passage of the amendment. I will soon be appearing before the state legislature and need some useful information about how English Only worked in other states. Thanks, Thomas L. Clark 702/895-3473 University of Nevada, Las Vegas (89154-5011) tlc[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]nevada.edu ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 10 May 1996 14:37:07 -0400 From: Jeutonne Brewer jpbrewer[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]HAMLET.UNCG.EDU Subject: Re: new word? I have never heard/read the word, "cybourgeoisie." I like it. As you note, the strangest part of all is that the Luddites have their own homepage. ************************************************** * jpbrewer[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]hamlet.uncg.edu * * Jeutonne_Brewer[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uncg.edu * * Jeutonne P. Brewer * * Department of English * * University of North Carolina at Greensboro * * Greensboro, NC 27412 * ************************************************** ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 10 May 1996 14:44:39 -0400 From: Jeutonne Brewer jpbrewer[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]HAMLET.UNCG.EDU Subject: Re: English Only Amendment North Carolina passed an English Only law in July, 1987. Shortly after that the legislature passed a resolution that said in effect that the legislature did not intend that the law would deny rights to anyone. If you are making a distinction between English Only and English as an Official Language, the NC law is of the official language variety. Since that time I think there has been mostly silence on the subject. Most North Carolinians don't seem to know that the state has such a law. That was certainly the case in my undergraduate class this semester when we talked about English Only laws. I have a copy of the NC law and the resolution. If you need or want a copy, I will be glad to mail them to you. ************************************************** * jpbrewer[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]hamlet.uncg.edu * * Jeutonne_Brewer[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uncg.edu * * Jeutonne P. Brewer * * Department of English * * University of North Carolina at Greensboro * * Greensboro, NC 27412 * ************************************************** ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 10 May 1996 16:42:12 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Re: English Only Amendment If you live in one of the twenty-six states which currently have such a law, please write to me about the changes (for good or ill) that have taken place in your state since the passage of the amendment. I think it was on ADS-L that this subject arose a couple of years ago and somebody said that Mississippi is one of the twenty-six states with such a law. If any changes have taken place here as a result of the law, I'm not aware of them. My guess is that very few Mississippians know we have such a law. I didn't until I read about it on ADS-L (or possibly another e-mail list). --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 10 May 1996 21:47:20 EDT From: Larry Horn LHORN[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]YALEVM.CIS.YALE.EDU Subject: Re: a completely unangry response.. From Bryan: Another handy affix is the "-y" ending, giving us "OGRY" (not to be confused with "ogrish"). N.B.: This works only inasmuch as the "-y" ending is a productive one in English (it certainly is for me..in the last week I've heard: "This shake is very banana-y," and "This table is more desky than.." Not to mention the subject heading of "Texan-y" on this very list the day before yesterday). _______________________________________ "He has to be the most derivative French painter I've ever seen. His still lifes are downright Braquy, his interiors completely Matissy, and his nudes totally Ingry." Larry ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 9 May 1996 to 10 May 1996 *********************************************** There are 3 messages totalling 54 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. out-of-pocket (2) 2. intrusive or unintrusive /l/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Sat, 11 May 1996 00:55:34 -0600 From: "Gregory J. Pulliam" gpulliam[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CHARLIE.ACC.IIT.EDU Subject: Re: out-of-pocket Thanks to all for the _out-of-pocket_ testimonials. You made my dad's day. Greg Pulliam Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 11 May 1996 13:19:54 -0400 From: "Margaret G. Lee -English" mlee[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CS.HAMPTONU.EDU Subject: Re: out-of-pocket In Friday's "Dear Abby" column, a reader wrote: "...the National Eye Care Project (NECP) has offered medical eye care to America's low income senior population for the past 10 years. Nearly 200,000 patients have received care, at no _out-of-pocket_ cost to them." --Margaret Lee Hampton University Hampton, VA On Sat, 11 May 1996, Gregory J. Pulliam wrote: Thanks to all for the _out-of-pocket_ testimonials. You made my dad's day. Greg Pulliam Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 11 May 1996 19:53:33 EST From: simon[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CVAX.IPFW.INDIANA.EDU Subject: intrusive or unintrusive /l/ I have to admit I watched the Seinfeld show at 10:30 last night. Most of the episode takes place in the health club an ADS-L member mentioned last month, during the discussion re Dole and 3rd person self referencing. Last night, Jerry and Kramer think that the man they see at the club is Salman Rushdie. Later, Kramer tells Jerry it is Rushdie. He's sure because when he asked the man his name, the man said he was "Sal Bass", n and that he's a writer. Kramer says Rushdie's substituting [baes] for [saem[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]n] ([AT SYMBOL GOES HERE] = schwa), which is clever because he's kept it as a fish. beth ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 10 May 1996 to 11 May 1996 ************************************************ From owner-ADS-L[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UGA.CC.UGA.EDU Mon May 13 23:03 CDT 1996 Received: from mailtest.dev.uga.edu (mailtest.dev.uga.edu [128.192.254.153]); by Archive.MsState.Edu using ESMTP (SMI-8.6/7.0m-FWP-MsState); id XAA15549; Mon, 13 May 1996 23:03:10 -0500 Received: from uga.cc.uga.edu (128.192.1.5) by mailtest.dev.uga.edu (LSMTP for Windows NT v1.0a) with SMTP id 0DDCCF60 ; Tue, 14 May 1996 0:05:26 -0400 Received: from UGA.CC.UGA.EDU (NJE origin LISTSERV[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UGA) by UGA.CC.UGA.EDU (LMail V1.2a/1.8a) with BSMTP id 9539; Tue, 14 May 1996 00:02:24 -0400 Message-Id: 199605140403.XAA15549[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]Archive.MsState.Edu Date: Tue, 14 May 1996 00:02:23 -0400 Reply-To: American Dialect Society ADS-L[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UGA.CC.UGA.EDU Sender: American Dialect Society ADS-L[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UGA.CC.UGA.EDU From: Automatic digest processor LISTSERV[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UGA.CC.UGA.EDU Subject: ADS-L Digest - 11 May 1996 to 13 May 1996 To: Recipients of ADS-L digests ADS-L[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UGA.CC.UGA.EDU Content-Type: text Content-Length: 10601 Status: R There are 8 messages totalling 258 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. Callaway/O'Connor Chair Ad 2. Dictionary-Thumping (2) 3. Meanwhile, back at the ranch... (2) 4. intrusive or unintrusive /l/ 5. RE Meanwhile, back at the ranch... (2) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Mon, 13 May 1996 13:07:09 -0400 From: Wayne Glowka wglowka[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MAIL.GAC.PEACHNET.EDU Subject: Callaway/O'Connor Chair Ad Here is a job advertisement that we would appreciate having circulated in English departments. Thanks for your help. Wayne Glowka The Fuller E. Callaway Endowed Flannery O'Connor Chair in Creative Writing Department of English, Speech, and Journalism Georgia College Milledgeville, Georgia 31061 Established fiction writers are invited to submit applications for a tenure-track appointment to the Fuller E. Callaway Endowed Flannery O'Connor Chair in Creative Writing at Georgia College, Milledgeville, Georgia 31061. Georgia College, with an enrollment of approximately 5,700 students and a liberal arts focus, is a senior comprehensive college in the University System of Georgia. It is the alma mater of Flannery O'Connor and the repository of the O'Connor manuscripts. The Callaway/O'Connor Chair offers a unique opportunity for a fiction writer to pursue his or her craft in the lovely antebellum capital of Georgia. Milledgeville has a population of 18,675, and Baldwin County has a population of 41,086. Located in central Georgia, Milledgeville affords easy access to the cities of Macon and Atlanta. Applicants must possess the following criteria: (1) recognized distinction in the field of fiction writing, (2) a record of outstanding teaching and demonstrated proficiency in the use of various teaching techniques, including technology-based applications, (3) recognized success in working with students to achieve high levels of learning and with faculty to stimulate the desire to improve teaching and learning, and (4) the ability to provide workshops and peer support. The Callaway/O'Connor Professor will teach two thirds of a full-time course load each quarter, with the remaining one-third time being used to serve as a catalyst among faculty for fostering improved teaching and learning campus wide. The Callaway/O'Connor Professorship is a nine-month, tenure-track appointment at the rank of professor, effective September 1, 1996. Applications will be received until July 1, 1996, or until position is filled. Salary $70,000 plus fringe benefits. Send letter of application, official transcripts of all college course work, three letters of recommendation, and a vita to Dr. R. B. Jenkins, Chairman, Department of English, Speech, and Journalism, CBX 44, Georgia College, Milledgeville, Georgia 31061. Georgia College is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer, ADA. Women, African-Americans, and other minorities are encouraged to apply. Dr. Ronald Bradford Jenkins, Chairman Department of English, Speech, and Journalism Georgia College Milledgeville, Georgia 31061 Telephone 912-453-4581; GIST 324-4581 FAX 912-454-0873 rjenkins[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]mail.gac.peachnet.edu ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 13 May 1996 15:02:15 -0400 From: "Bethany K. Dumas" dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UTKUX.UTCC.UTK.EDU Subject: Dictionary-Thumping ---------- Forwarded message ---------- Date: Mon, 13 May 1996 08:46:26 PDT From: Brian Reid reid[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]mejac.palo-alto.ca.us snip 3. My opinion was that he was engaging in dictionary-thumping. This is like bible-thumping, but instead of saying "it says here in the bible that you are a bad person" he was saying "it says here in the dictionary that you are a bad person." Book thumpers are, in my opinion, too cowardly to stand up for their own beliefs, so they brandish the book instead. This technique is the rhetorical equivalent of Edgar Bergen's use of Charlie McCarthy to speak for him. -----end forwarded message----- Until I read the post from which the paragraph above comes, I had never heard the phrase "dictionary-thumping." I like it. Are others familiar with it? Bethany Bethany K. Dumas, J.D., Ph.D. | Applied Linguistics, Language & Law Dep't of English, UT, Knoxville | EMAIL: dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]utk.edu 415 McClung Tower | (423) 974-6965 | FAX (423) 974-6926 Knoxville, TN 37996-0430 | See Webpage at http://ljp.la.utk.edu ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 13 May 1996 14:14:25 -0500 From: "Kathleen M. O'Neill" koneil1[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UIC.EDU Subject: Meanwhile, back at the ranch... Is anyone else familiar with the above phrase? In my universe, it is fairly popular. But I've been trying, to no avail, to trace its evolution and locate its origin. Can anyone provide me with information on the earliest citation of the above phrase? Thanks, cowboys and cowgirls. =╗▀ ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;; ;Kathleen M. O'Neill ... Language Laboratory Technician I ; ;koneil1[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uic.edu ... u55354[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uicvm.cc.uic.edu ; ;:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::; ;University of Illinois at Chicago ... Language Laboratory ; ;703 South Morgan Street (M/C 042) ... Grant Hall, Room 311 ; ;Chicago, IL 60607-7025 ; ;312.996.8838 or 312.996.8836 ... 312.996.5501 FAX ; ;URL: http://www2.uic.edu/depts/langlab/ ; ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;; ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 13 May 1996 15:22:23 -0400 From: "Dale F.Coye" CoyeCFAT[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]AOL.COM Subject: Re: intrusive or unintrusive /l/ In a message dated 96-05-11 20:54:31 EDT, you write: Last night, Jerry and Kramer think that the man they see at the club is Salman Rushdie. Later, Kramer tells Jerry it is Rushdie. He's sure because when he asked the man his name, the man said he was "Sal Bass", n and that he's a writer. Kramer says Rushdie's substituting ═baes▀ for ═saem[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]n▀ ([AT SYMBOL GOES HERE] = schwa), which is clever because he's kept it as a fish. I saw it too, and Jerry was quick to point out to Kramer that his theory was stupid because its pronounced SAM not SAL, but I was reminded that I knew this guy from NYC who did say SAL m[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]n, and how surprised I was by that. Was this an idiosyncracy or is it more widespread? Dale Coye The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching Princeton ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 13 May 1996 16:01:41 +0000 From: Grant Barrett gbarrett[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]JERRYNET.COM Subject: RE Meanwhile, back at the ranch... I think it's a paraphrase from Orwell's 1984, which says something along = the lines of "back at the farm".=20 I could be way off, but I don't have the book near, so I'll just throw it= out there. -------------------------------------- From: Kathleen M. O'Neill Meanwhile, back at the ranch... Is anyone else familiar with the above phrase? In my universe, it is fairly popular. But I've been trying, to no avail, to trace its evolution and locate its origin. Can anyone provide me with information on the earliest citation of the above phrase? ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 13 May 1996 16:02:12 PDT From: Duane Campbell dcamp[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]EPIX.NET Subject: Re: RE Meanwhile, back at the ranch... From: Kathleen M. O'Neill Meanwhile, back at the ranch... Is anyone else familiar with the above phrase? It goes back to silent movies, at least. You would see the posse chasing the rustlers across the range, then a screen would come on -- white on black -- saying "Meanwhile, back at the ranch . . ." and the film would cut to the guy with the black moustache putting the moves on the school marm. (My spell checker says that's a "school marmot", but that must be for more progressive schools than I attended.) As a cliche, it was still popular in horse operas of the forties. Duane Campbell dcamp[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]epix.net In the beginning the Earth was without form and void. Why didn't they leave well enough alone? ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 13 May 1996 15:29:14 -0600 From: Kat Rose Kat.Rose[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]SPOT.COLORADO.EDU Subject: Meanwhile, back at the ranch... The earliest use of which I am aware is in titles (text frames) of silent movies, but it seems reasonable to wonder if this device was used in serial stories of "the wild West" that were printed in magazines in the 19th and early 20th centuries. This doesn't answer your question, but perhaps it will help. [AT SYMBOL GOES HERE] -- --- Kat Rose Kat.Rose[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]spot.Colorado.edu My words, my rights, my responsibility ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 13 May 1996 19:10:39 -0400 From: "Bethany K. Dumas" dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UTKUX.UTCC.UTK.EDU Subject: Re: Dictionary-Thumping On Mon, 13 May 1996, Tom Creswell asked that I "post the entire message from which the "dictinnary thumper" paagraph was extracted." Tom said further that he has some doubts about the accuracy of the analogy between quoting the bible as a source of information and doing the same with a dictionary. Sounds to me like the writer just lost an argument and was trying to rationalize his indefensible position. Tom, I could do that, but I don't think it would help. The post was part of a rather long essay explaining why a listmember had been kicked off the list. One reason many listmembers (including me) had found the person in question obnoxious was that he attacked many individuals, using words that many of us found highly objectionable. When challenged, the individual quoted dictionary definitions, ostensibly to show that he was using what he called the "technical definitions" of words. He was, in other words, ignoring connotative meanings of words in favor of narrowly denotative ones. In my opinion, the poster I quoted was 100% justified in taking the stand and action that he did. It would take many postings to establish the full context, and I would have to get the permission of many posters, including someone who has been banned from the list for at least a month. And all I was interested in was whether others had heard the phrase "dictionary-thumper" in the same sense. Bethany Bethany K. Dumas, J.D., Ph.D. | Applied Linguistics, Language & Law Dep't of English, UT, Knoxville | EMAIL: dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]utk.edu 415 McClung Tower | (423) 974-6965 | FAX (423) 974-6926 Knoxville, TN 37996-0430 | See Webpage at http://ljp.la.utk.edu ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 11 May 1996 to 13 May 1996 ************************************************ There are 10 messages totalling 269 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. Streak (2) 2. packy? 3. "Meanwhile, back at the ranch ...," (4) 4. out-of-pocket (2) 5. English Only Amendment ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Tue, 14 May 1996 09:44:59 -0500 From: "Kathleen M. O'Neill" koneil1[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UIC.EDU Subject: Streak Sorry to cross-post, but this was on the Linguist list, and I thought someone from this bunch might have an answer. ----Begin Forwarded Message---- Date: Mon, 13 May 1996 23:46:02 -0500 From: The Linguist List linguist[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]tam2000.tamu.edu Subject: 7.690, Qs: E-mail,"Streak", Applied, Dative/Essive, Discourse Date: Sat, 11 May 1996 12:10:02 MDT From: hcannon[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]macalstr.edu (Heather Cannon) Subject: etymology of "streak" Members, I am trying to find the etymology of the phrase "to streak", meaning to run naked. A prof here at Macalester College claims that the phrase originated here, but I can't find any proof to back that up - or to disprove it. The dictionaries I have checked don't even list this as a meaning of "streak" so I guess it's slang, though certainly in common usage -- especially here at Mac where it's a popular pasttime. :) Any help or leads would be very much appreciated. Thank you. Heather Cannon hcannon[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]macalstr.edu ----End Forwarded Message---- ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;; ;Kathleen M. O'Neill ... Language Laboratory Technician I ; ;koneil1[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uic.edu ... u55354[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uicvm.cc.uic.edu ; ;:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::; ;University of Illinois at Chicago ... Language Laboratory ; ;703 South Morgan Street (M/C 042) ... Grant Hall, Room 311 ; ;Chicago, IL 60607-7025 ; ;312.996.8838 or 312.996.8836 ... 312.996.5501 FAX ; ;URL: http://www2.uic.edu/depts/langlab/ ; ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;; ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 14 May 1996 11:37:38 -0400 From: "Christopher R. Coolidge" ccoolidg[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MOOSE.UVM.EDU Subject: Re: packy? I lived in Amherst, MA for the better part of the 80's myself, and the word "packy" was so ubiquitous when referring to going on a booze run that I was surprised to not hear it anywhere else. I never hear it in Vermont, where I now live. I'm not even sure what the equivalent here is, since I haven't had a drink in years and I know very few people well here who drink more than occasionally. ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 14 May 1996 12:20:25 -0600 From: Samuel Jones smjones1[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]FACSTAFF.WISC.EDU Subject: Re: "Meanwhile, back at the ranch ...," Is anyone else familiar with the above phrase? Miz O'Neill, ma'am, YUP! In my universe, it is fairly popular. MAHN, TOO! 'N HAS BEEN FER YERS 'N YERS. But I've been trying, to no avail, to trace its evolution and locate its origin. AH SUSpect HOLLYWOOD WRITERS, MA'AM. Can anyone provide me with information on the earliest citation of the above phrase? Don' rightly know. Ma'am, eff'n this be THUH "earliest," but Ah 'stinctly 'member this pertikuhler phrase appurring awun the motion picture THEater screen, in mah liddle ole Oklahoma town, adurin' them-there rousin' (now-vintage), 13-week-long, Saturday-mornin', cowboy-shoot-'em-up serials, in which the hero always wore uh white haejuht, 'n rode a white horse, uh palomino, or jes' maybe uhn Appaloosa. Yee HAH!! Thanks, cowboys and cowgirls. =╗▀ Right tole'ble proud tuh be uv hep, ma'am. samjones ____________________________________________________________________________ DR. SAMUEL M. JONES INTERNET: smjones1[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]facstaff.wisc.edu Prof. of Music & Latin American Studies TELNET: samjones[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]macc.wisc.edu 5434 Humanities Building FAX: 608 + 262-8876 (UW) 455 North Park Street __________________________________________ University of Wisconsin-Madison TELEPHONES: 608 + 263-1900 (UW-Lv. message) Madison, WI 53706-1483 * 608 + 263-1924 * (UW-Office - * VOICE MAIL--Lv message) ____________________________________________________________________________ "Pen-y-Bryn" TELEPHONES: 608 + 233-2150 (Home) 122 Shepard Terrace 608 + 233-4748 (Home) Madison, WI 53705-3614 ____________________________________________________________________________ ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 14 May 1996 12:39:32 -0600 From: Joan Houston Hall jdhall[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]FACSTAFF.WISC.EDU Subject: Re: out-of-pocket For those of you who know "out of pocket" to mean 'unavailable, out of the usual place' (as in "I'll be out of pocket for a week, but you can leave a message on my machine"), are you also familiar with the analogical "in pocket"? We have only one example: "We called to tell her that we are going to be in Texas over the Christmas break and want to come by to visit. Her reply was, "Sure, y'all come on by. We'll be in pocket then." Thanks-- Joan Hall, DARE ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 14 May 1996 11:46:24 PDT From: "//www.usa.net/~ague" ague[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]REDRCK.ENET.DEC.COM Subject: Re: "Meanwhile, back at the ranch ...," Back in my high school days, late fifties, we had a whole series of humorous, in a sophomoronic way, "meanwhile, back the"'s. The only one that I remember today is, "meanwhile back at the oasis, the Arabs were eating their dates". You had to be there. Even Looney Tunes liked that one. A Bugs Bunny comic published around then, that had a panel with the caption, "Meanwhile back at the oasis, ...". In the panel were a couple of sheiks standing around a palm tree in a desert, all munching on some small piece of fruit, with one saying in a balloon box, "Hmmm, these dates are really good!" -- Jim ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 14 May 1996 14:00:14 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Re: out-of-pocket For those of you who know "out of pocket" to mean 'unavailable, out of the usual place' (as in "I'll be out of pocket for a week, but you can leave a message on my machine"), are you also familiar with the analogical "in pocket"? We have only one example: "We called to tell her that we are I offer myself as one negative datum. I consider "out of pocket" = "unavailable" quite well known and ordinary but have never heard "in pocket." --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 14 May 1996 14:01:37 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Re: "Meanwhile, back at the ranch ...," Back in my high school days, late fifties, we had a whole series of humorous, in a sophomoronic way, "meanwhile, back the"'s. The only one that I remember today is, "meanwhile back at the oasis, the Arabs were eating their dates". You had to be there. I was. Jackson, Mississippi, high school graduation 1961. I remember "meanwhile back at the oasis" well. --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 14 May 1996 15:26:07 -0500 From: Katherine Catmull kate[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]BGA.COM Subject: Re: "Meanwhile, back at the ranch ...," But I've been trying, to no avail, to trace its evolution and locate its origin. I have a vague impression that it's from a western radio serial, probably the Lone Ranger. I don't know where I _got_ this impression, though--possibly from my uncle, who was one of the LR shows juvenile voices for a while and eventually wrote his dissertation on it. On the other hand, I may have invented the connection entirely. If I can get hold of Uncle Dave to ask I'll let you know what he says. Kate Catmull kate[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]bga.com ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 14 May 1996 21:32:34 -0500 From: Dennis Baron debaron[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UIUC.EDU Subject: Re: English Only Amendment Illinois has had an official language since 1923, when American was declared the language of the state. This law was put through by an anti-British coalition of Irish and Jewish Chicago pols, who wanted to express their displeasure at the treatment by the mother country of Ireland and Palestine. In 1969 the law was quietly amended to make _English_ the official language. But it has had no practical effect. It is laws like that of Arizona, which the US Supreme Court has recently agreed to review, that can actually be punitive. The AZ law forbids government employees from using any language other than English in the course of their jobs. It was declared unconstitutional on 1st amendment grounds by the US Circuit Court. The Supreme Court will also rule on the broader issue of whether states can make laws establishing an official language. Copies of federal legislation currently being considered (the Language of Government Act and constitutional amendments, together with comments by supporters and opponents which appear in the Congressional Record, are available on Thomas, the Library of Congress Web Site. I have just received a transcript of the hearings held last October on language legislation. Dennis -- Dennis Baron debaron[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uiuc.edu Department of English office: 217-333-2392 University of Illinois fax: 217-333-4321 608 S. Wright Street home: 217-384-1683 Urbana, IL 61801 ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 14 May 1996 23:18:47 -0400 From: Al Futrell awfutr01[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]HOMER.LOUISVILLE.EDU Subject: Re: Streak On Tue, 14 May 1996, Kathleen M. O'Neill wrote: I am trying to find the etymology of the phrase "to streak", meaning to run naked. A prof here at Macalester College claims that the phrase originated here, but I can't find any proof to back that up - I think almost every college in the country claims to have coined the term. We did it in Louisville in the early 70's. Some guy even streaked the Carson show once (or was it the academy awards?). Al Futrell -- awfutr01[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]homer.louisville.edu -- http://www.louisville.edu/~awfutr01 Dept of Communication -- University of Louisville ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 13 May 1996 to 14 May 1996 ************************************************ There are 12 messages totalling 311 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. Streak (5) 2. Willing to Risk Spam? 3. to streak 4. biff (2) 5. send=public (3) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Wed, 15 May 1996 00:19:30 -0600 From: "Gregory J. Pulliam" gpulliam[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CHARLIE.ACC.IIT.EDU Subject: Re: Streak Can streaking really be back so soon? I hope MacAlester's not indicative of a trend in this case. Given todays body piercing fad, I can see how streaking in the 90's could be trickier than it was in the 70s. Greg Pulliam Chicago Gregory Pulliam Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago, IL gpulliam[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]charlie.acc.iit.edu ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 15 May 1996 06:32:51 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Willing to Risk Spam? I'm going to be out of town for about five days soon and am probably not going to take my computer since access would be costly. (This will be the first time I've been away from the net for that long in years.) I was thinking that maybe I should set ADS-L to "send=public" again for that period in case somebody on the list has an address problem. So far, very few people seem to have had problems, but occasionally there is one -- e.g., many of the Georgetown people on ADS-L subscribed when their system was throwing an 'acc' into the from line that's no longer there. Are y'all willing to live with the risk of spam for those days? The gopher/ftp/web archives will also be behind while I'm gone. Someday I'm going to find time to get into the teach-yourself-perl-scripting book I bought so that I can automate some of the daily log-compiling that I do for ADS-L. --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 15 May 1996 07:57:36 -0400 From: Margaret Ronkin ronkinm[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]GUSUN.GEORGETOWN.EDU Subject: to streak It's funny to feel that I'm history, but I don't mind sharing the reply that I sent to Heather at Macalester. ________________________________________________________________________ Dear Heather, I am writing in response to your posting on _Linguist_, asking for help with the etymology of "to streak". The information that I have comes from the following source: Partridge, Eric. 1984. A dictionary of slang and unconventional English... Paul Beale (ed.). London, Melbourne, and Henley: Routledge & Kegan Paul. p. 1165. streak, v. occ. streek... To go very fast: 1768, 'Helenore' Ross, '═She▀ forward did streak';..., in late C.19, coll. Prob ex flashes of lightening. The form "to streak it" is U.S. --2. By specialization, 'To scurry stark naked through a public place or assembly as a form of protest against some grievance' (R.S. 1974), or 'trying to prove a point, or out of sheer exhibitionism' (P.B.); whence "streaking", the vbl n., and "streaker" one who does this: s. in 1973; both nn. and v. were, by 1975, coll. and, by 1976, S.E. It was a phenomenon of the early 1970s, with subsequent echoes. R.S. = Ramsey Spencer P.B. = Paul C. Beale, editor of the present dictionary *** I doubt that the term was invented at Mac, since this entry says it was slang in 1973, and I was studying at Mac then; that's about when streaking caught on there big time. If you check old (early 1970s) issues of the _Mac Weekly_, you'll find write-ups on various humorous episodes. (I'm proud/embarassed to say that I was involved/written up). Thanks for making me feel sooo old, Heather, and good luck with your research! Maggie ________________________________________________________________________ ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 15 May 1996 08:17:02 -0400 From: David Muschell dmuschel[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MAIL.GAC.PEACHNET.EDU Subject: Re: Streak Having been recently graduated when the first streakers were exposed here in Georgia, I wasn't there at the event(s); however, from my understanding, the term derived from the rapidity of movement of said bare ones. Unlike strippers whose purpose is slow removal of garments, streakers are "pre-buffed" and zip quickly past their intended audience, streaking by. Avoidance of arrest seemed to be the primary motivation, though perhaps the speed and tendency of viewers to focus on "forbidden" body parts gave the undressed hopes of remaining incognito. David ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 15 May 1996 17:26:56 -0400 From: "David Bergdahl (614) 593-2783" BERGDAHL[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]OUVAXA.CATS.OHIOU.EDU Subject: biff On my American English class's listserv, a student wrote: "As Dr. Bergdahl was talking about words that people biff, such as Pulitzer Surprise, one such word came to my mind. Actually, I almost biffed it when I was typing it in a friend's e-mail message today. The word is this morning, but for some reason, in my head, I couldn't think how to spell it because I was thinking of this smorning, which is how it sounds when you say it. As a result, I almost typed it in like that. I had to think twice before I typed it in and then realized it was this morning. I was wondering if anyone else out there has the same problem as I with certain words. Respond back if you do." I'd never met "biff" before: anyone else familiar with it? The reference is to Pinker's discussion of what we on this list have been calling Mondegreens. ______________________________________________________ David Bergdahl BERGDAHL[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]OUVAXA.CATS.OHIOU.EDU Associate Professor of English Language and Literature Ohio University / Athens fax: (614) 593-2818 ______________________________________________________ ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 15 May 1996 15:42:30 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: send=public My only response to this morning's query was one saying that "send= public" setting was fine. So as of a few minutes ago, ADS-L is back to that status. Let's hope May isn't a favorite month for spamming. --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 15 May 1996 17:11:16 -0400 From: Jesse T Sheidlower jester[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]PANIX.COM Subject: Re: biff On my American English class's listserv, a student wrote: "As Dr. Bergdahl was talking about words that people biff, such as Pulitzer Surprise, one such word came to my mind. Actually, I almost biffed it when I was typing it in a friend's e-mail message today. The word is this morning, but for some reason, in my head, I couldn't think how to spell it because I was thinking of this smorning, which is how it sounds when you say it. As a result, I almost typed it in like that. I had to think twice before I typed it in and then realized it was this morning. I was wondering if anyone else out there has the same problem as I with certain words. Respond back if you do." I'd never met "biff" before: anyone else familiar with it? The reference is to Pinker's discussion of what we on this list have been calling Mondegreens. Pamela Munro's 1989 _U.C.L.A. Slang_ has an entry for _biff_ 'fail (an examination)', which I suspect is simply an overly specific definition. The word must mean 'screw up', broadly. I've heard a few other examples. Jesse Sheidlower Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang jester[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]panix.com ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 15 May 1996 14:06:52 -0700 From: Peter McGraw pmcgraw[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CALVIN.LINFIELD.EDU Subject: Re: Streak On Wed, 15 May 1996, David Muschell wrote: Having been recently graduated when the first streakers were exposed here in Georgia, I wasn't there at the event(s); however, from my understanding, the term derived from the rapidity of movement of said bare ones. Unlike strippers whose purpose is slow removal of garments, streakers are "pre-buffed" and zip quickly past their intended audience, streaking by. Avoidance of arrest seemed to be the primary motivation, though perhaps the speed and tendency of viewers to focus on "forbidden" body parts gave the undressed hopes of remaining incognito. David As I recall it from the early 70s in Tennessee (though newspaper reports indicated it was a national phenomenon), one thing the streakers DID keep covered was their face - typically using a paper bag, with eye holes, over their head. This must have been hazardous in some respects, but it did (supposedly) keep them anonymous. The fad prompted at least one popular song, "They Call Him The Streak" (at least that was the first line of the chorus). Peter McGraw Linfield College McMinnville, OR ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 15 May 1996 17:21:28 -0400 From: TERRY IRONS t.irons[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MOREHEAD-ST.EDU Subject: Re: send=public I like getting junk e-missives myself. Spam has interesting possiblities as a dietary supplement. Besides, it makes for a fun day. And I do have a delete key, which I use often!?! I know that we have specific scholarly concerns, to which this list is devoted, but can every subscriber say that every post hir has made fits that ADS concern? So who are we to join the censorship campaign? Support free speech on the internet. Wear a blue ribbon. My may day tirade was in earnest. Sorry to have abused you so, but it did spark interesting replys, which were germaine to variationist study even if my post was not. By the way, Natalie, when you learn enough about Perl/CGI on your own, clue me in. I empathize with your absence: I can't afford long distance/lack of remote telnet logins either. Give us a vacation tale on your return. Terry (*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*) Terry Lynn Irons t.irons[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]morehead-st.edu Voice Mail: (606) 783-5164 Snail Mail: UPO 604 Morehead, KY 40351 (*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*) ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 15 May 1996 16:27:40 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Re: Streak indicated it was a national phenomenon), one thing the streakers DID keep covered was their face - typically using a paper bag, with eye holes, over The ones I saw at Mississippi State revealed all -- no face-coverings. My favorite streaking episode was one that occurred several months after the fad had ended. Some Ed Psych faculty were having a party across the street from where I was at a huge party of English faculty and others. A couple of the Ed Psych people decided it would be fun to streak our party. They did not, however, realize how jam-packed the house was. They got in the door, stark naked, and then got stuck in the crowd and had to inch their way through very slowly, with all kinds of funny comments being made about their bodies. One of them was from out of town, but the other was a faculty member here, who was around until just a few years ago. In all those years between the streaking night and when he left, every time I saw him, I thought of him naked. --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 15 May 1996 16:34:50 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Re: send=public I know that we have specific scholarly concerns, to which this list is devoted, but can every subscriber say that every post hir has made fits that ADS concern? So who are we to join the censorship campaign? All of my postings are strictly scholarly -- like the one I just sent about the Ed Psych streaker... By the way, Natalie, when you learn enough about Perl/CGI on your own, clue me in. I empathize with your absence: I can't afford long distance/lack of remote telnet logins either. Give us a vacation tale on your return. And y'all start thinking about what we can do about ADS archives (ADS-L should be easier) if I'm in Japan for a year (May '97 - May '98), with a commercial net provider that charges for online time and with telnet that would be impossibly slow for editing gopher/ftp/web files on the other side of the world. But we don't need to worry about it yet. It will be sometime fall semester before I know whether I'm going -- if I pursue it at all. --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 15 May 1996 15:16:10 -0500 From: Tom Beckner TMBECKNER[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]TAYLORU.EDU Subject: Re: Streak I can't speak to the origins of "streak" at Macalester, but it was a brief but popular activity during the early 1970's, c. 1973-74. There was even a streaker at the Academy Awards show. The term would seem to be a natural adaptation of streak as used to describe lightening, for instance, or any narrow band of light, and of course a sterak of luck had long been a brief duration. By the way, Webster's Tenth does list this as ""to run naked through a public place (p.1163), and the 3rd edition of the American Heritage dictionary has one usage: "move at a high speed; rush" which it attributes to Middle Eng. "streke' (line) from Old Eng. "strica," which would also make the usage you describe a natural evolution. What dictionary are you using there? ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 14 May 1996 to 15 May 1996 ************************************************ There are 4 messages totalling 462 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. 10.28 conference call 2. biff (2) 3. Streaking--1960s ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Thu, 16 May 1996 03:10:37 -0400 From: "M. Lynne Murphy" 104LYN[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MUSE.ARTS.WITS.AC.ZA Subject: 10.28 conference call in case anyone's interested... ------- Forwarded Message Follows ------- Received: from SpoolDir by MUSE (Mercury 1.21); 16 May 96 03:38:52 GMT +2:00 Return-path: owner-humanist[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]lists.Princeton.EDU Received: from lists.Princeton.EDU by muse.arts.wits.ac.za (Mercury 1.21) with ESMTP; 16 May 96 03:38:33 GMT +2:00 Received: by lists.Princeton.EDU id 23245.s1-2 ; Wed, 15 May 1996 21:35:43 -0400 Received: from ponyexpress.Princeton.EDU (═128.112.129.131▀) by lists.Princeton.EDU with SMTP id 23276.s2-1 ; Wed, 15 May 1996 21:32:54 -0400 Received: from flagstaff.Princeton.EDU (mccarty[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]flagstaff.Princeton.EDU ═128.112.131.154▀) by ponyexpress.Princeton.EDU (8.6.12/8.6.12) with ESMTP id VAA22422 for humanist[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]lists.Princeton.EDU ; Wed 15 May 1996 21:32:42 -0400 Received: (mccarty[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]localhost) by flagstaff.Princeton.EDU (8.6.12/8.6.12) id VAA15228; Wed, 15 May 1996 21:32:40 -0400 Message-Id: Pine.SUN.3.91.960515213209.14819C-100000[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]flagstaff.princeton.edu Date: Wed, 15 May 1996 21:32:40 -0400 (EDT) Reply-To: mccarty[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]phoenix.Princeton.EDU Sender: owner-humanist[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]lists.Princeton.EDU From: Humanist mccarty[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]phoenix.Princeton.EDU To: Humanist Discussion Group humanist[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]lists.Princeton.EDU Subject: 10.28 conference call MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII X-To: Humanist humanist[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]lists.Princeton.EDU X-Listprocessor-Version: 7.2 -- ListProcessor by CREN X-PMFLAGS: 34078848 Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 10, No. 28. Center for Electronic Texts in the Humanities (Princeton/Rutgers) Information at http://www.princeton.edu/~mccarty/humanist/ ═1▀ From: Dr Tony McEnery mcenery[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]comp.lancs.ac.uk (248) Subject: Teaching and Language Corpora 96 CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS TALC96 - TEACHING AND LANGUAGE CORPORA Lancaster University, UK, 9th-12th August, 1996 INCLUDED IN THIS EMAIL: General Details Provisional Programme Registration Details AIMS OF THE CONFERENCE While the use of computer text corpora in research is now well established, they are now being used increasingly for teaching purposes. This includes the use of corpus data to inform and create teaching materials; it also includes the direct exploration of corpora by students, both in the study of linguistics and of foreign languages. Talc96 will build upon the success of Talc94, which brought together researchers and teachers who are involved in such work, to take part in an international exchange of current experience and expertise. THEMES KEY THEME: Talc96 will have a special focus on evaluating the claims made for corpora in linguistics and language teaching. OTHER THEMES: which the conference is expected to cover include - 1.) The use of corpora in student led learning and investigation. 2.) Software for corpus based language and linguistics learning. 3.) Developing corpora for teaching purposes. 4.) The exploitation of corpus based teaching and learning materials. 5.) The theory and practice of corpus based teaching and learning. Papers presented at the conference will be of the typical 20 minutes talk plus ten minutes of questions format. WORKSHOPS Talc96 will also host several workshops related to teaching and language corpora. To give an example of what those workshops may be, Talc94 had a variety of workshops such as "Multilingual Corpus Building" and "Concordancing and Corpus Retrieval". Workshops will be of one to two hour duration. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- TALC96 - Provisional Programme. Day One (9th August): 09.00 - 13.00: Registration and Welcome. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 13.00 - 15.00: General Issues in Teaching and Language Corpora I 1. Issues in Applied Corpus Linguistics, Lynne Flowerdew, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology 2. Corpus Linguistics - evaluating the diffusion of an innovation, Chris Kennedy, University of Birmingham 3. Concordancing in English Language Teaching, Bernhard Kettemann, University of Graz 4. The Role of the Corpus Based 'Phrasicon' in English Language Teaching, Stephen Magee, University of St Andrews and Michael Rundell ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 15.00 - 15.30: Refreshments Break ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 15.30 - 17.00: Creating Materials and Tests 1. CALL Materials Derived from Integrating 'Expert' and 'Interlanguage' Corpora Findings, Lynne Flowerdew, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology 2. Multilingual concordance-based exercise types, Francine Roussel, University of Nancy 3. Using Corpus Word Frequency Data in the Automatic Generation of English Language Cloze Tests, David Coniam, Chinese University of Hong Kong ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 19.00 Dinner ------------------------------------------------------------------------ Day Two (10th August) 9.00-11.00: Parallel Corpora in Language Teaching and Translation 1. Parallel Texts in Language Teaching, Michael Barlow, Rice University 2. Corpora and Terminology: Software for the Translation Programme at Goteborg University, Pernilla Danielson and Daniel Ridings, Goteborg University 3. Parallel and Comparable Bilingual Corpora in Language Teaching and Learning, Carol Peters, CNR, Pisa. 4. COSMAS - a multipurpose system for the exploitation of text corpora, F Bodmer, J Cloeren and R Neumann, Institut fur Deutsche Sprache and Royal Spanish Academy ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 11.00 Refreshments Break ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 11.30 - 13.00: Teaching Languages other than English Using Corpora 1. An Experiment in the Learning of French through Corpus Linguistics, Glyn Holmes, University of Western Ontario 2. A Corpus for Teaching Portuguese, A. Berber Sardinha, University of Liverpool 3. Research into the Functions of Particles in a Corpus, Marta Fernandez-Villaneuva ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 13.00 Lunch ------------------------------------------------------------------------ 14.30-18.00: Workshops (Parallel Sessions) Parallel Workshop Session A Michael Barlow (Rice University) "ParaConc" (14:30 - 16:00) Chris Tribble (Lancaster University): "Developing Corpora for Teaching Purposes" (14:30 - 16:00) Parallel Workshop Session B Philip King, Tim Johns, David Wools (Birmingham University): "The Lingua Project - Parallel Concordancing" (16:00 - 18:00) Knut Hofland, "The ICAME Archive & Concordancing" (Bergen University) (16:00 - 18:00) -------------------------------------------------------------------- 19.00: Dinner -------------------------------------------------------------------- Day Three (11th August) 9.00-11.00: Corpora in Supporting ESP/EAP 1. Encouraging Students to Explore Language and Culture in Early Modern English Pamphlets, Josef Schmied, University of Chemnitz 2. The Ideology of Science as a Collocation: how Corpus Linguistics can Expand the Boundaries of Genre Analysis, Chris Gledhill, Aston University 3. Corpora, Genre Analysis and Dissertation Writing: An Evaluation of the Potential of Corpus-Based Techniques in the Study of Academic Writing, Chris Carne, University of Reading 4. Investigating Grounding Across Narrative and Oral Discourse with Students, Tony Jappy, University of Perpignan ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 11.00: Refreshments ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 11.30 - 13.00: Corpora Supporting Aspects of Language Pedagogy 1. Roberta Facchinetti: The exploration of English diachronic corpora by foreign language students 2. Paul Bowden, Mark Edwards, Peter Halstead and Tony Rose: Knowledge extraction from corpora for pedagogical applications 3. Mary-Ellen Okurowski: Using Authentic Corpora and Language Tools for Adult-Centered Learning ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 13.00 Lunch ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 14.30-16.00: Corpora and Student Writing 1. Exploiting Learner Corpus Data in the Classroom: Form Focused Instruction and Data Driven Learning, Sylviane Granger, Universite Catholique de Louvain 2. Approaching the Assessment of Performance Unit Archive of Schoolchildren's Writing from the Point of View of Corpus Linguistics, M. Shimazumi & A Berber Sardinha, University of Liverpool 3. Teaching L1 and L2 composition in a multicultural environment, Robert Faingold, University of Tulsa. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 16.00: Refreshments ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 16.30-18.00: Special Session on the British National Corpus 16:30 The British National Corpus as a Language Learner Resource, Guy Aston,University of Bologna 17:00 An Introduction to Retrieval from the BNC Using Sara, Lou Burnard, OUCS. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 19.00 Dinner ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 21.00: Software Demonstrations ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Day Four (12th August) 9 am-11.00: Corpus Resources and Systems 1. Teaching Terminology Using Corpora, Jennifer Pearson, Dublin City University 2. A Textual Clues Approach for Generating Metaphors as Explanations by an Intelligent Tutoring System, V. Prince & S. Ferrari, LIMSI-CNRS 3. Designing a CALL System Using Corpora for Speakers of Cantonese, John Milton, City University Hong Kong 4. Marrying VERBALIST to concordance data, John Higgins, University of Stirling ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 11.00: Refreshments ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 11.30-13.00: General Issues in Teaching and Language Corpora II 1. Evaluating Corpora - are we Asking the Right Questions?, Marina Dossena, Bergamo University 2. Corpus Linguistics as an Academic Subject, Ourania Hatzidaki, University of Birmingham 3. A Corpus Based Description of Headline Grammar, John Morley, University of Sienna ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 13.00-14.30: Lunch ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 14.30: Close of Conference ----------------------------------------------------------------------- ======================================================================= TALC96 REGISTRATION. ==================== To register, you may either: 1. Send this form by surface mail to: TALC96, Department of Linguistics and Modern English Language, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4YT United Kingdom 2. Or fax it to: +44 - 1524 - 843085 3. Or email it to: mcenery[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]computing.lancaster.ac.uk or mcenery[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]comp.lancs.ac.uk 4. Or fill in the interactive form on the World Wide Web at the URL http://www.comp.lancs.ac.uk/computing/research/ucrel/talc/ Please register BEFORE 1st June 1996, otherwise we cannot guarantee availability of accommodation. The fee for TALC96 includes the following: Attendance at all TALC96 sessions Conference Pack including Book of Abstracts Accommodation on 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th August Meals: 9th August: afternoon coffee and dinner 10th August: breakfast plus mid-morning coffee, lunch, afternoon coffee and dinner. 11th August: breakfast plus mid-morning coffee, lunch, afternoon coffee and dinner. 12th August: breakfast plus mid-morning coffee, lunch. Accommodation is provided in single study bedrooms on the Lancaster University main campus. Payment Details: Fees are payable in Pounds Sterling or US Dollars. Please make cheques payable to 'Lancaster University'. Sterling money orders can also be used for payment, and must be made payable to 'Lancaster University'. US Dollar cheques are also acceptable, using a fixed exchange rate of 1.5 $US to the Pound. Unfortunately, we cannot accept credit card payments. ================================================================ REGISTRATION FORM ================= Name: _______________________________________________ Title: _______________________________________________ Department: _______________________________________________ Institution/ Organisation: _______________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________ Postcode/City: _______________________________________________ Country _______________________________________________ Telephone: ____________________________ Fax: ____________________________ Email: ____________________________ Attendance at TALC96 ═ ▀ Residential #225.00 ═ ▀ Student #170.00 ═ ▀ Non-Residential #90.00 ═ ▀ NOTE: Students must provide written evidence of their full time student status, such as an official headed letter from their supervisor. Special dietary requirements: None ═ ▀ Vegetarian ═ ▀ Vegan ═ ▀ Other ═ ▀ Please specify: _______________ ______________________________ Any other comments: ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ Local Organising Committee Gerry Knowles - Lancaster University, UK Tony McEnery - Lancaster University, UK Anne Wichmann - Central Lancashire University, UK Simon Botley - Lancaster University, UK General Organising Committee Bernhard Kettemann - Graz, AU Lou Burnard - Oxford University, UK Tim Johns - Birmingham University, UK ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 16 May 1996 01:23:28 -0700 From: Kim & Rima McKinzey rkm[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]SLIP.NET Subject: Re: biff I've never heard biff before. And my two cents goes to Mondegreen - I like it much better. Rima ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 16 May 1996 14:28:16 CDT From: Randy Roberts robertsr[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]EXT.MISSOURI.EDU Subject: Streaking--1960s A UPI story which appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle, 8 April 1965, page 8, reads: ═Boulder, Colorado▀ This spring's fad on the University of Colorado campus is called 'streaking.' It means running naked through a public gathering." The rest of this story relates that UC students who streaked in Mazatlan, Mexico, in March, were chased by police and shot at. Five students were arrested and spent two days in jail without clothes. Herb Caen's column which appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle of 18 September 1967, page 27, reads: "If you're in Sausalito one of these nights, and some guy with no clothes on runs past, fast as hell, your're seeing a 'streaker.' It's a contest, called 'Streaking,' that started a few years ago on the campuses, and seems to be reviving. The idea is to be seen naked by as many people as possible without getting caught; . . ." Hope this helps. Randy Roberts University of Missouri-Columbia robertsr[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ext.missouri.edu ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 16 May 1996 22:31:56 -0400 From: Al Futrell awfutr01[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]HOMER.LOUISVILLE.EDU Subject: Re: biff Of course, "biff" is also a computer term. In the UNIX world "biff" is a command that tells the system whether a user wants to be notified when mail arrives. By extension, you can "biff" someone, which basically means 'interrupt' someone by sending him/her mail in the middle of a session. You can either "biff y" or "biff n" depending on whether you want to be notified. Now, why is it "biff?" Net folklore has it that the guy who wrote the function named it after his dog. Who knows? Al Futrell -- awfutr01[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]homer.louisville.edu -- http://www.louisville.edu/~awfutr01 Dept of Communication -- University of Louisville ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 15 May 1996 to 16 May 1996 ************************************************ There are 10 messages totalling 221 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. singular "we" (2) 2. interfacial engineering 3. biff 4. Yuz (3) 5. RE Yuz 6. help subscribing to HEL-L (2) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Thu, 16 May 1996 23:36:07 -0500 From: Dan Goodman goodman[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]FREENET.MSP.MN.US Subject: singular "we" Wed, 8 May 1996 05:31:17 -0500 Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Re: singular "we" I wonder if this is found elsewhere in the Upper Midwest? I thought singular "we" as in "we'll see you" was pretty common throughout the U.S. I've heard it compared with the use of "y'all" in set expressions like "y'all come back" when said to just one person. I think maybe Michael Montgomery has made such a comparison in one of his articles on "y'all." --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) I don't remember encountering it in other places I've lived: Ulster County NY, New York City, San Francisco, Los Angeles. Did I miss it, or have I managed (till moving to MPLS) to live in the only parts of the US where this isn't common? Meanwhile, elsewhere, a former and a current resident of Brooklyn are discussing whether Brooklynites use "youse" as a singular. Dan Goodman ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 17 May 1996 07:16:17 -0400 From: "M. Lynne Murphy" 104LYN[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MUSE.ARTS.WITS.AC.ZA Subject: interfacial engineering i'd say this is a word of the year candidate, if only i knew what it meant. this is the aboutt-the-author blurb at the end of an editorial re-posted to the humanist list about a controversy at the u of minnesota: Fennell Evans is director of the University of Minnesota's Center for Interfacial Engineering. the only thing i can think that interfacial engineering might be is the technology of mashing. does anyone know? lynne --------------------------------------------------------------------- M. Lynne Murphy 104lyn[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]muse.arts.wits.ac.za Department of Linguistics phone: 27(11)716-2340 University of the Witwatersrand fax: 27(11)716-8030 Johannesburg 2050 SOUTH AFRICA ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 17 May 1996 08:21:47 -0500 From: Ron Rabin RABINRL[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]SNYBUFAA.CS.SNYBUF.EDU Subject: Re: singular "we" 1) we as singular: I heard it growing up in Los Angeles in the 50s, at school at Berkeley in the 60s. 2) youse as singular: in Buffalo, NY, I have only heard youse as a plural form of you. I was told/read (reference long lost) that youse comes from a 2nd person plural in Irish Gaelic that found its way into English (in Ireland? in the US?) of the Irish (some identifiable subset?) and was adopted by other groups living/working with them as the others learned English in the US. In the greater Buffalo area, it's found geographically rather than ethnically, giving the borrowing theory some vague support. ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 17 May 1996 08:31:28 EDT From: Arnold Zwicky zwicky[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]LING.OHIO-STATE.EDU Subject: Re: biff Net folklore has it that the guy who wrote the function named it after his dog. the story of biff is told, i believe, in The Hacker's Dictionary (my copy of which is in my california house, alas, but it's available several places on the net). biff, the dog, barked whenever the mail carrier came. and the guy who wrote the function was a woman. a specific known woman; my daughter, who is a large-scale unix systems administrator, knows her, but i, being a linguist who knows infinitestimal amounts about unix, have forgotten her name. arnold (zwicky[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ling.ohio-state.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 17 May 1996 08:54:41 +0000 From: Grant Barrett gbarrett[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]JERRYNET.COM Subject: Yuz My aunt who has lived in Southeast Missouri her entire life says "yuz" as= in, "Yuz want to come back to the house for some cake?" The pronunciatio= n is between schwa and a "oo" in "foot". She uses it for singular and plu= ral. ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 17 May 1996 10:29:05 -0500 From: Ron Rabin RABINRL[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]SNYBUFAA.CS.SNYBUF.EDU Subject: Re: Yuz Is it possible there are two "youse" that are distributed differently by ethnicity, geography and history? In Buffalo, NY, youse has the clear oo of hoot. In Southern California I've also heard yiz with the i of hit from those from the Midwest. ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 17 May 1996 10:39:09 EDT From: "Steven K. Brehe" SBREHE[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]NUGGET.NGC.PEACHNET.EDU Subject: Re: Yuz aunt who has lived in Southeast Missouri her entire life says "yuz" as= in, "Yuz want to come back to the house for some cake?" The pronunciatio= n is between schwa and a "oo" in "foot". She uses it for singular and plu= ral. I grew up in rural east central Missouri, west of St. Louis, and never, ever heard "Yuz" from native Missourians, although I certainly heard "youse" in Illinois, esp. in the Chicago area. (I must confess I don't know SE MO very well.) Is it possible your aunt in eastern MO picked up this usage from friends in western IL? Steven Brehe sbrehe[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]nugget.ngc.peachnet.edu ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 17 May 1996 11:05:24 +0000 From: Grant Barrett gbarrett[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]JERRYNET.COM Subject: RE Yuz Missouri is in many ways a divided state. East Central Missouri (maybe Me= xico, Kingdom City, Troy, Union, Hermann, Washington, possibly Rolla) is = dialectically different than Southeast Missouri (Doniphan, Popular Bluff,= Greenville, Piedmont, Silva, Lutesville, the Bootheel etc.). Even the Li= ttle Dixie speech of Mexico and other parts of Audrain county is differen= t than the Ozark/Arkansas drawl of Southeast Missouri.=20 My aunt (my father's sister) travels to St. Louis once or twice a year an= d to the best of my knowledge does not know anyone in Illinois except her= brother, my uncle. We are talking about a woman that did not get indoor = plumbing until the mid-eighties. She works in a pool hall, managing the f= lea market. Her husband is a big rig driver and runs a saw mill. My father, who is from Southeast Missouri, and my mother, from St. Louis,= have different modes of speech but grew up only 150 miles apart.=20 -------------------------------------- Date: 5/17/96 10:43 AM From: Steven K. Brehe aunt who has lived in Southeast Missouri her entire life says "yuz" as=3D in, "Yuz want to come back to the house for some cake?" The pronunciat= io=3D n is between schwa and a "oo" in "foot". She uses it for singular and p= lu=3D ral. I grew up in rural east central Missouri, west of St. Louis, and never, ever heard "Yuz" from native Missourians, although I certainly heard "youse" in Illinois, esp. in the Chicago area. (I must confess I don't know SE MO very well.) Is it possible your aunt in eastern MO picked up this usage from friends in western IL? Steven Brehe sbrehe[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]nugget.ngc.peachnet.edu ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 17 May 1996 16:27:33 -0400 From: "Dale F.Coye" CoyeCFAT[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]AOL.COM Subject: help subscribing to HEL-L I've been trying to get the right address to subscribe to the History of the English Language List for weeks. Does anyone know how? Dale Coye Princeton, NJ ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 17 May 1996 16:33:32 -0400 From: Robert Swets bobbo[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]BCFREENET.SEFLIN.LIB.FL.US Subject: Re: help subscribing to HEL-L I'd like to know, too. ******************************************************************************* __ __ COLOR ME ORANGE | | | | Voice: 954-782-4582; Fax: 954-782-4535 R. D. Swets (Archbishop Bob) | | | | Zion Lutheran School: 954-421-3146, 170 N.E. 18th Street ______| | | |______ Ext. 135; Fax: 954-421-4250 Pompano Beach, FL 33060 (________) (________) Ft. Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel: bobbo[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]bcfreenet.seflin.lib.fl.us 954-356-4635; Fax: 954-356-4676 ******************************************************************************* On Fri, 17 May 1996, Dale F.Coye wrote: I've been trying to get the right address to subscribe to the History of the English Language List for weeks. Does anyone know how? ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 16 May 1996 to 17 May 1996 ************************************************ There are 3 messages totalling 50 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. interfacial engineering 2. help subscribing to HEL-L 3. help subscribing to hel-l ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Sat, 18 May 1996 01:01:46 -0700 From: Kim & Rima McKinzey rkm[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]SLIP.NET Subject: Re: interfacial engineering Interfacial engineering - ya sure it's not related to cosmetic surgery? :-) Rima ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 18 May 1996 08:56:05 EDT From: Sonja Lanehart LANEHART[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UGA.CC.UGA.EDU Subject: Re: help subscribing to HEL-L I believe the address for the HEL list is: Hel-l[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ebbs.english.vt.edu *********************************************************************** Sonja L. Lanehart Dept. of English (300 Park Hall) Phone: (706) 542-2260 University of Georgia Fax: (706) 542-2181 Athens, GA 30602-6205 E-mail: Lanehart[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uga.cc.uga.edu *********************************************************************** ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 18 May 1996 11:40:26 EST From: simon[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CVAX.IPFW.INDIANA.EDU Subject: Re: help subscribing to hel-l To subscribe to the hel-l, try this: listserv[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ebbs.english.vt.edu LEAVE THE SUBJECT LINE BLANK In the body of the text, write subscribe hel-l YOUR FIRST NAME YOUR LAST NAME and send it. You should get a confirmation. Then the address for contributing to the list is hel-l[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ebbs.english.vt.edu best, beth ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 17 May 1996 to 18 May 1996 ************************************************ There is one message totalling 56 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. English only ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Sat, 18 May 1996 13:31:30 +0000 From: "Albert E. Krahn" akrahn[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]IBM.NET Subject: English only Dennis Baron wrote: Date: Tue, 14 May 1996 21:32:34 -0500 From: Dennis Baron debaron[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UIUC.EDU Subject: Re: English Only Amendment Illinois has had an official language since 1923, when American was declared the language of the state. This law was put through by an anti-British coalition of Irish and Jewish Chicago pols, who wanted to express their displeasure at the treatment by the mother country of Ireland and Palestine. In 1969 the law was quietly amended to make _English_ the official language. But it has had no practical effect. It is laws like that of Arizona, which the US Supreme Court has recently agreed to review, that can actually be punitive. The AZ law forbids government employees from using any language other than English in the course of their jobs. It was declared unconstitutional on 1st amendment grounds by the US Circuit Court. The Supreme Court will also rule on the broader issue of whether states can make laws establishing an official language. Copies of federal legislation currently being considered (the Language of Government Act and constitutional amendments, together with comments by supporters and opponents which appear in the Congressional Record, are available on Thomas, the Library of Congress Web Site. I have just received a transcript of the hearings held last October on language legislation. Dennis -- Dennis Baron debaron[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uiuc.edu Department of English office: 217-333-2392 University of Illinois fax: 217-333-4321 608 S. Wright Street home: 217-384-1683 Urbana, IL 61801 ---------- Wisconsin is working on one of these stupid laws, too. Do you think we could sue the Attorney General if the law passes and get him to change his name to General Attorney -- and alter all the records from the past hundred years to read in proper English word order? Perhaps we could drag the Surgeon General into court, too, especially whenever he talks in Latin and Greek words instead of translating aureomycin into golden fungus. Or maybe the judges could be fined if they uttered such things as habeas corpus. I wonder what the ACLU would think about it. After all, what's sauce for the goose . . . . AKRA ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 18 May 1996 to 19 May 1996 ************************************************ There are 2 messages totalling 43 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. interfacial engineering (2) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Fri, 17 May 1996 09:19:58 EDT From: Undetermined origin c/o LISTSERV maintainer owner-LISTSERV[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UGA.CC.UGA.EDU Subject: Re: interfacial engineering I've never seen "interfacial engineering" before, but at a wild guess it's a derived adjective from "interface," which might have to do with computers ("human interface" in the sense of how the person uses the computer, what the computer looks like, that sort of thing). But I'm only guessing--maybe a query to whoever posted that editorial to the humanist list would be more fruitful. Vicki Rosenzweig vr%acmcr.uucp[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]murphy.com | rosenzweig[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]acm.org New York, NY ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 20 May 1996 14:29:25 -0700 From: Peter McGraw pmcgraw[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CALVIN.LINFIELD.EDU Subject: Re: interfacial engineering Oh! And here I thought "human interface" was what happened when a two-faced person talked to himself! Peter On Fri, 17 May 1996, Undetermined origin c/o LISTSERV maintainer wrote: I've never seen "interfacial engineering" before, but at a wild guess it's a derived adjective from "interface," which might have to do with computers ("human interface" in the sense of how the person uses the computer, what the computer looks like, that sort of thing). But I'm only guessing--maybe a query to whoever posted that editorial to the humanist list would be more fruitful. Vicki Rosenzweig vr%acmcr.uucp[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]murphy.com | rosenzweig[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]acm.org New York, NY ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 19 May 1996 to 20 May 1996 ************************************************ There are 2 messages totalling 84 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. linguistic data consortium 2. NEW WEB SITE!! AMAZING $$$ OPPORTUNITY! ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Tue, 21 May 1996 06:12:29 -0400 From: "M. Lynne Murphy" 104LYN[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MUSE.ARTS.WITS.AC.ZA Subject: linguistic data consortium perhaps this will be of interest to some. from the humanist list: ------- Forwarded Message Follows ------- Humanist Discussion Group, Vol. 10, No. 35. Center for Electronic Texts in the Humanities (Princeton/Rutgers) Information at http://www.princeton.edu/~mccarty/humanist/ --------------------- Date: Mon, 20 May 1996 08:24:24 -0400 From: LDC Office ldc[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]unagi.cis.upenn.edu Announcing a NEW RELEASE from the LINGUISTIC DATA CONSORTIUM Radio Broadcast News Continuous Speech Recognition Corpus (Hub-4) This set of CD-ROMs contains all of the speech data provided to sites participating in the DARPA CSR November 1995 Hub-4 (Radio) Broadcast News tests. The data consists of digitized waveforms of MarketPlace (tm) business news radio shows provided by KUSC through an agreement with the Linguistic Data Consortium, and detailed transcriptions of those broadcasts. The software NIST used to process and score the output of the test systems is also included. The data is organized as follows: CD26-1: Training Data-Ten complete half-hour broadcasts with minimally-verified transcripts. The transcripts are time aligned with the waveforms at the story-boundary level. CD26-2: Development-Test Data-Six complete half-hour broadcasts with verified transcripts. The transcripts are time aligned with the waveforms at the story-and turn-boundary level. Index files have been included which specify how the data may be partitioned into 2 test sets. CD26-6 Evaluation-Test Data-Five complete half-hour broadcasts with verified/adjudicated transcripts. The transcripts are time aligned with the waveforms at the story-, turn-, and music-boundary level. An index file has been included which specifies how the data was partitioned into the test set used in the CSR 1995 Hub-4 tests. Institutions that have membership in the LDC during the 1996 Membership Year will be able to receive a copy of the Radio Broadcast News at no additional charge, in the same manner as all other text and speech corpora published by the LDC. Nonmembers can receive a copy of this corpus for research purposes only for a fee of $2500. If you would like to order a copy of this corpus, please email your request to ldc[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]unagi.cis.upenn.edu. If you need additional information before placing your order, or would like to inquire about membership in the LDC, please send email or call (215) 898-0464. Further information about the LDC and its available corpora can be accessed on the Linguistic Data Consortium WWW Home Page at URL http://www.cis.upenn.edu/~ldc. Information is also available via ftp at ftp.cis.upenn.edu under pub/ldc; for ftp access, please use "anonymous" as your login name, and give your email address when asked for password. ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 21 May 1996 21:19:50 -0400 From: Ryan DeLuca MHunter33[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]AOL.COM Subject: NEW WEB SITE!! AMAZING $$$ OPPORTUNITY! You won't believe how EASY it is! Learn these AMAZING new secrets to making a lot of money online now by going to: http://members.aol.com/deluca22/money.htm P.S. This is NOT MY SITE!! I just wanted to help other AOL members!! :) ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 20 May 1996 to 21 May 1996 ************************************************ There are 3 messages totalling 59 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. interfacial engineering 2. "straight drive" (2) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Wed, 22 May 1996 17:49:37 -0400 From: Margaret Ronkin ronkinm[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]GUSUN.GEORGETOWN.EDU Subject: interfacial engineering A scientist-friend informs me that, depending on context, interfacial engineering can refer to: (1) A part of chemical engineering concerned with the management of molecular events at the surfaces of solids, liquids, or gases. (2) A part of computer programming concerned with using software to manage the interaction of computers with their human users. (3) A part of industrial engineering concerned with understanding and using huuman interactions in the workplace to increase productivity, safety, etc. My consultant suggested doing a Web search for "interfacial engineering" using a broad-based search engine like Alta Vista to find titles/references that define the term. Maggie Ronkin International Language Programs and Research Georgetown University ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 22 May 1996 18:20:04 -0400 From: Kathy Burns burns[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CYC.COM Subject: "straight drive" Dear ADS-listers, My brother and his girlfriend were visiting this weekend, and she told me that she was sick of "straight drive" and wanted her next car to be an automatic. I have never heard this term used to mean standard or manual transmission. Are any of you familiar with this usage? My brother's girlfriend is in her 20's and grew up in NW South Carolina (the Uplands or Upcountry or whatever it's called). Thanks, Kathy Burns ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 22 May 1996 15:36:24 PDT From: Joseph Jones jjones[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UNIXG.UBC.CA Subject: Re: "straight drive" In Piedmont North Carolina in the 1950's and 1960's the opposite of automatic (automobile transmission) was straight drive. Joseph Jones jjones[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]unixg.ubc.ca University of British Columbia Library ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 21 May 1996 to 22 May 1996 ************************************************ There are 7 messages totalling 191 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. newspaper lingo 2. "straight drive" (3) 3. Honors thesis on regional dialect perception 4. Job Ad 5. To ADS Members--New Library of Congress Regulations ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Thu, 23 May 1996 04:23:17 -0700 From: Crissie Trigger crissiet[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]IX.NETCOM.COM Subject: Re: newspaper lingo from crissiet[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ix.netcom.com (SETH SKLAREY) Some interesting stuff from the BONG Bulletin Copyright (c) 1996 by BONG. All rights reserved. To subscribe: E-mail to listserv[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]netcom.com. In text say subscribe bong-l. NEWSPAPER LINGO Stephen G. Bloom, ex of Los Angeles Times and Dallas Morning News now professing journalism at the University of Iowa, did a dandy piece for The American Editor on newsroom jargon. Yes, "30" translates from telegraphic code XXX, meaning the end. Stringers were paid by story length, measured by a string at the editor's desk. PI (pronounced pee eye), lede, hed, graf, folo and TK are deliberate misspellings so they won't get into print. Lede is copy, lead is metal. Bloom didn't mention it, but even now old- timers are edgy about using "lead" unless it's a story about leading a band or a drill team. Wood is the big headline, often so big that wooden type was used. Cereal spitter was a gory photo, especially for ayem papers' breakfast readers. Bloom suggests that some editors now use what they call the "Wheaties test," not to cull boring shots but to encourage something called good taste. It's the clearest proof that times have changed. Spike was the nail where bad stories went. Slug is a story's name, originally cast in a line of Linotype metal. Lobster shift, describing the overnighters, has a varied etymology. Bloom says morning is lobster-catching time, bad lighting makes for red eyes. The tale of Hearst's New York World being near the lobster boat piers and both kinds of crews going to work simultaneously isn't mentioned. Lob shift is a term virtually unknown outside newspapering. Lobstermen don't even use it. Maybe they say Grumpy printers with red noses from drinking on their way to work shift. ============ The world's foremost expert in newsroom atmosphere, BONG Chief Copyboy Charley Stough, Dayton Daily News, 45 S. Ludlow St., Dayton, Ohio 45401 tosses a rose to NYTNS bloodhounds worldwide. E-mail copyboy[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]dma.org. Phone (513) 225-2445 after 3 p.m. eastern. Fax 225-2489. ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 23 May 1996 08:53:43 -0400 From: "Dennis R. Preston" preston[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]PILOT.MSU.EDU Subject: Re: "straight drive" In the mid and late 1950's in the Louisville (KY) area, a manual transmission was a 'stick' 'stick shift' or 'straight stick' I never heard the 'full' form 'straight stick shift.' Automatic transmissions were 'automatic,' never 'automatic shift' (or 'stick'). Therefore, for example, sentences like 'Is it a stick or an automatic?' were OK, while 'Is it a stick or automatic shift?' sound funny to me. Glad to hear that some younguns still use the terminology, but sorry to hear they don't like the transmission. Dennis (still a straight stick user) Preston Dear ADS-listers, My brother and his girlfriend were visiting this weekend, and she told me that she was sick of "straight drive" and wanted her next car to be an automatic. I have never heard this term used to mean standard or manual transmission. Are any of you familiar with this usage? My brother's girlfriend is in her 20's and grew up in NW South Carolina (the Uplands or Upcountry or whatever it's called). Thanks, Kathy Burns Dennis R. Preston Department of Linguistics and Languages Michigan State University East Lansing MI 48824-1027 USA preston[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]pilot.msu.edu Office: (517)432-1235 Fax: (517)432-2736 ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 23 May 1996 12:39:32 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Re: "straight drive" The first term I ever knew for a manual transmission, long before I had ever heard "manual transmission," was "straight shift." I don't think I ever heard "straight drive," however. The normal term in Mississippi in the '50s was "straight shift." --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 23 May 1996 13:47:52 -0400 From: "MICHELLE M. MILES" 104612.1550[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]COMPUSERVE.COM Subject: Honors thesis on regional dialect perception I am an undergraduate student in communication sciences and disorders at James Madison University. I am currently working on an honors thesis pertaining to regional dialect perception as well as people's perceptions of their own dialect. I am now in the beginning stages of my literature review. I would really appreciate any current research references or information that any of you would have relating to my topic. Thank you. Michelle Miles ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 23 May 1996 13:41:37 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Job Ad Date: Thu, 23 May 1996 11:35:34 -0700 From: Kim Chief Elk chiefelk[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]cedar.fhda.edu To: maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu Subject: Dean, Language Arts Could this announcement be posted to ADS-L thanks much. Foothill Community College 12345 El Monte Road Los Altos Hills, CA 94002 Student population approx. 13,000 Located in the San Francisco Bay Area, is searching for a Dean, Language Arts. The Division includes English, English as a Second Language, Foreign Languages. If interested, please send e-mail request with postal address to cms6438[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]mercury.fhda.edu Thanks ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 23 May 1996 13:50:23 -0500 From: Tom Beckner TMBECKNER[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]TAYLORU.EDU Subject: Re: "straight drive" Growing up in southern Ohio during the 1950's, an area influenced by Appalachain transplants, I did hear "straight drive" occasionally in the context of "manual transmission." ------------------------------ Date: Thu, 23 May 1996 15:37:29 -0500 From: LAWRENCE DAVIS DAVIS[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]WSUHUB.UC.TWSU.EDU Subject: To ADS Members--New Library of Congress Regulations Steven J. Herman, Chief of the Collections Management Division of the Library of Congress sent me a letter informing me that, beginning May 28, every user of the Library of Congress reading rooms will be required to have a Reader Registration Card, available at the Reader Registration Station in Room G22 of the Thomas Jefferson Bldg. on Monday, Wed., and Thurs. from 8:30 am to 9:00 pm and on Tues., Fri., and Sat. from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. Mr. Herman assures us that the process will take about 10 minutes only and will be instituted for both enhancing the security of the collections and also making the system easier to use. You will need photo identification. Your loving president, Larry Davis ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 22 May 1996 to 23 May 1996 ************************************************ There are 8 messages totalling 215 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. "straight drive" 2. inservice v.t. (4) 3. "I was about to say" (3) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Fri, 24 May 1996 03:27:47 -0400 From: Bob Haas rahaas[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]HAMLET.UNCG.EDU Subject: Re: "straight drive" Kathy, I grew up in the Blue Ridge Mountains of NC, and have always heard a manual transmission referred to as a "straight transmission," or oftentimes simply "a straight," e.g., "What kinda transmission you got in that car?" "A straight." "Straight drive" works just as well. Bob Haas UNCG Department of English rahaas[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]hamlet.uncg.edu ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 24 May 1996 08:38:35 EDT From: Orin Hargraves 100422.2566[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]COMPUSERVE.COM Subject: inservice v.t. Below, a quote from a recent e-mail message I received: I was so excited to receive your message!!! This will be great fun now that we have e-mail in our school. We're getting inserviced next Wed. on using it, but I have addresses and am having fun trying all this on my own. I'm still fairly new at learning about the big picture of e-mail and internet... The writer is a K-12 teacher in the upper Midwest. Is this use of "inservice" teacher jargon? Has anyone else heard or seen it? Any info appreciated. With best wishes, Orin Hargraves ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 24 May 1996 12:03:19 -0400 From: Suzanne Cadwell scadwell[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]EMAIL.UNC.EDU Subject: "I was about to say" Hello, folks! I'm a doctoral student in Rhetoric & Composition at UNC-CH, a student of Connie Eble's, and a year-long lurker on this list. Just within the past year, I've noticed myself and a handful of others (including Prof. Eble!) using "I was about to say" as a discourse marker or comment clause in conversation. My working hypothesis, if one can even term it that, is that it is a gesture of either: 1) informing the conversation partner that you had had the same thought they have just expressed 2) a general statement of sympathy with the sentiments the conversation partner had just expressed I've only "caught" one man using the clause, who insisted that he uses it only as an affectation. Is this a recent phenomenon or am I just suddenly aware of it? Thanks! Suzanne Cadwell ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 24 May 1996 12:47:24 -0400 From: TERRY IRONS t.irons[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MOREHEAD-ST.EDU Subject: Re: "I was about to say" On Fri, 24 May 1996, Suzanne Cadwell wrote: using "I was about to say" as a discourse marker or comment clause in conversation. My working hypothesis, if one can even term it that, is that it is a gesture of either: 1) informing the conversation partner that you had had the same thought they have just expressed 2) a general statement of sympathy with the sentiments the conversation partner had just expressed I've only "caught" one man using the clause, who insisted that he uses it only as an affectation. Is this a recent phenomenon or am I just suddenly aware of it? I haven't really paid much attention to this phrase, but it does work as a clear discourse marker of some kind. But my sense is that works in a manner somewhat different than your hypothesis, although there could be two or more forms here. My sense is that the phrase, "I was about to say" functions as a means of claiming the floor or a turn, after an interruption. In this context though, I hear it more as, "As I was about to say..." It all depends on what comes in the "..." Sometimes we hear "the same thing" which points to the collaborative/sympathy function. But we also here "before you interrupted." Terry Irons (*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*) Terry Lynn Irons t.irons[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]morehead-st.edu Voice Mail: (606) 783-5164 Snail Mail: UPO 604 Morehead, KY 40351 (*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*) ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 24 May 1996 14:38:58 -0400 From: "Dale F.Coye" CoyeCFAT[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]AOL.COM Subject: Re: inservice v.t. Before I got into the education racket (ten years ago) I had never heard inservice in any form. The noun, as in "We're conducting an inservice on whole language teaching," (meaning what used to be called a teachers' workshop) has been around at least that long. I wonder how many people outside of education know about it? I've never heard this use as a verb, but am not surprised. Dale Coye The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching Princeton, NJ ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 24 May 1996 12:00:48 -0700 From: William King WFKING[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU Subject: Re: inservice v.t. This is common in Arizona as a noun, K-12 education. Additionally, an inservice is usually a district affair and involves pay. Bill King SLAT program University of Arizona ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 24 May 1996 16:56:08 -0500 From: "Kathleen M. O'Neill" koneil1[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UIC.EDU Subject: Re: "I was about to say" Suzanne spake thusly: My working hypothesis, if one can even term it that, is that it is a gesture of either: 1) informing the conversation partner that you had had the same thought they have just expressed 2) a general statement of sympathy with the sentiments the conversation partner had just expressed Actually, I (and many others I've heard) have at least one more use for it. Speaker A makes a statement which is either intentionally or unintentionally misleading, then clarifies intended meaning. Speaker B responds with a hearty, "I was about to say...!" For example: A: I'm spending the weekend at the beach. B: You are? (Thinking it's a little cold yet in Chicago for the beach.) A: Yes. In Cozumel. (wry grin) B: OH! I was about to say...! Never mind that it's not a likely scenario. I'm allowed to dream if I want to. ;) And have a great Memorial Day weekend, all! =^] ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;; ;Kathleen M. O'Neill ... Language Laboratory Technician I ; ;koneil1[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uic.edu ... u55354[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uicvm.cc.uic.edu ; ;:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::; ;University of Illinois at Chicago ... Language Laboratory ; ;703 South Morgan Street (M/C 042) ... Grant Hall, Room 311 ; ;Chicago, IL 60607-7025 ; ;312.996.8838 or 312.996.8836 ... 312.996.5501 FAX ; ;URL: http://www2.uic.edu/depts/langlab/ ; ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;; ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 24 May 1996 18:58:22 CDT From: Marla Broom mlbroom[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]SAUMAG.EDU Subject: Re: inservice v.t. I've never heard 'inserviced' as a verb but this is teacher jargon meaning workshops done for teachers. In my district in Arkansas, teachers are required to have 30 hours of 'inservice' credit per year to keep certificates active. Sounds as if someone is coming to the school to give teachers instruction in the use of their new e-mail set up. Marla Broom ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 23 May 1996 to 24 May 1996 ************************************************ There are 12 messages totalling 288 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. I was about to say 2. "took a shine to" (6) 3. inservice v.t. (2) 4. "I was about to say" 5. "took a shine to" [To take a shine to . . .] 6. (in)service, v.t. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Sat, 25 May 1996 08:19:42 EDT From: Orin Hargraves 100422.2566[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]COMPUSERVE.COM Subject: Re: I was about to say My experience is that the far more common form of this in conversation is "I was gonna say". Some speakers overuse it to the point that it is more a filler than a marker, but I think it has all the uses that Suzanne and Kathleen pointed out. With reference to Kathleen's interpretation specifically, viz., that it is used to clarify a misleading statement: overusers of the phrase are often those who are unable to let ANY statement go unchallenged, or in other words, those who must add their two cents to every thought expressed! Orin Hargraves ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 25 May 1996 10:08:20 -0500 From: Alicia Spiegel aspiegel[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]SIU.EDU Subject: "took a shine to" Dear ADS: While listening to an 'infomercial' on the television regarding an exercise machine for older persons, I heard an elderly gentleman say that he "took a shine to exercising". I've only heard this once before in my life. Any idea how this came about, and what it really means? Thanks. Alicia Spiegel (aspiegel[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]siu.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 25 May 1996 11:18:56 -0400 From: "M. Lynne Murphy" 104LYN[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MUSE.ARTS.WITS.AC.ZA Subject: Re: inservice v.t. This is common in Arizona as a noun, K-12 education. Additionally, an inservice is usually a district affair and involves pay. Bill King SLAT program University of Arizona i'm surprised no one else has heard this in higher education as well. at umass/amherst i was inserviced (i don't remember if it was used as a verb there) as a resident assistant and the title "inservice training" appears in my teaching portfolio. (i think we used it at illinois too, but it might just be that i used it, having picked it up at umass.) i'd suspect that some other service professions might have it, but don't know. has anyone asked a nurse? lynne --------------------------------------------------------------------- M. Lynne Murphy 104lyn[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]muse.arts.wits.ac.za Department of Linguistics phone: 27(11)716-2340 University of the Witwatersrand fax: 27(11)716-8030 Johannesburg 2050 SOUTH AFRICA ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 25 May 1996 11:22:26 -0400 From: "M. Lynne Murphy" 104LYN[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MUSE.ARTS.WITS.AC.ZA Subject: Re: "I was about to say" like terry irons, my initial reaction to "(as) i was about to say..." is that it's sort of a reprimand for an interruption. ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 25 May 1996 10:24:33 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Re: "took a shine to" he "took a shine to exercising". I've only heard this once before in my life. Any idea how this came about, and what it really means? I don't know where it came from, but I've heard it all my life as an expression meaning to like something immediately. --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 25 May 1996 10:40:43 -0500 From: Gerald Walton vcgw[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]SUNSET.BACKBONE.OLEMISS.EDU Subject: Re: "took a shine to" At 10:24 AM 5/25/96 -0500, you wrote: I don't know where it came from, but I've heard it all my life as an expression meaning to like something immediately. Same here, from same general section of the country. GWW ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 25 May 1996 15:26:00 -0400 From: "David A. Johns" djohns[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]AFN.ORG Subject: Re: "took a shine to" At 10:24 AM 5/25/96 -0500, you wrote: he "took a shine to exercising". I've only heard this once before in my life. Any idea how this came about, and what it really means? I don't know where it came from, but I've heard it all my life as an expression meaning to like something immediately. --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) I've heard it all my life, and I grew up in New England. But it doesn't sound quite right applied to an activity; I think I would use it only of people. I also seem to have a sense that the "shine" was unexpected, as in an adult taking a shine to an unruly child. David Johns Waycross College Waycross, GA ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 25 May 1996 18:49:53 -0600 From: Samuel Jones smjones1[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]FACSTAFF.WISC.EDU Subject: Re: "took a shine to" [To take a shine to . . .] Having lived in both Oklahoma & Texas for extended periods of time, I can tell you that "to take a shine to" is an expression I have heard used there all the years I was located in that part of the US, particularly among ranchers, cattlemen, farmers, and country folk. "At the pie supper, Harry took quite a shine to the new schoolmarm, and kinda cozied up to her!" "When Mary Beth heard the new banker was single, she took quite a shine to him!" At 10:24 AM 5/25/96 -0500, you wrote: he "took a shine to exercising". I've only heard this once before in my life. Any idea how this came about, and what it really means? I don't know where it came from, but I've heard it all my life as an expression meaning to like something immediately. --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) I've heard it all my life, and I grew up in New England. But it doesn't sound quite right applied to an activity; I think I would use it only of people. I also seem to have a sense that the "shine" was unexpected, as in an adult taking a shine to an unruly child. David Johns Waycross College Waycross, GA ____________________________________________________________________________ DR. SAMUEL M. JONES INTERNET: smjones1[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]facstaff.wisc.edu Prof. of Music & Latin American Studies TELNET: samjones[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]macc.wisc.edu 5434 Humanities Building FAX: 608 + 262-8876 (UW) 455 North Park Street __________________________________________ University of Wisconsin-Madison TELEPHONES: 608 + 263-1900 (UW-Lv. message) Madison, WI 53706-1483 * 608 + 263-1924 * (UW-Office - * VOICE MAIL--Lv message) ____________________________________________________________________________ "Pen-y-Bryn" TELEPHONES: 608 + 233-2150 (Home) 122 Shepard Terrace 608 + 233-4748 (Home) Madison, WI 53705-3614 ____________________________________________________________________________ ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 25 May 1996 20:56:00 -0400 From: Beverly Flanigan FLANIGAN[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]OUVAXA.CATS.OHIOU.EDU Subject: (in)service, v.t. "Inservice" as a noun has been around quite a while, I believe. However, I heard a variant of the verb form just the other day and now, serendipitously, have a chance to sound off about it. A K-12 teacher called about getting ESL validation in our summer program and talked, with naive approval, of how she incorporates kids of limited English proficiency into her special ed. classes. When I protested that special ed. is not the place for LEP kids, she shifted gears and agreed with me but then added that she often feels these children aren't "serviced" adequately. Having grown up on a farm in Minnesota, I know another meaning for "serviced." Talk about adding insult to injury. Educationese is full of such depersonalizing jargon, as is Speech/Hearing Clinic talk, where even schoolchildren are "clients." Beverly Flanigan Ohio University ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 25 May 1996 22:13:12 -0400 From: "Bethany K. Dumas" dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UTKUX.UTCC.UTK.EDU Subject: Re: "took a shine to" On Sat, 25 May 1996, Alicia Spiegel wrote: While listening to an 'infomercial' on the television regarding an exercise machine for older persons, I heard an elderly gentleman say that he "took a shine to exercising". I've only heard this once before in my life. Any idea how this came about, and what it really means? I don't recall hearing the phrase "took a shine to exercising," but I have heard "took a shine to" all my life. I don't know its origin and don't have time to do any research right now. It means,"found myself simpatico with." Bethany K. Dumas, J.D., Ph.D. | Applied Linguistics, Language & Law Dep't of English, UT, Knoxville | EMAIL: dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]utk.edu 415 McClung Tower | (423) 974-6965 | FAX (423) 974-6926 Knoxville, TN 37996-0430 | See Webpage at http://ljp.la.utk.edu ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 25 May 1996 22:48:26 -0400 From: Johnnie Renick tenderrite[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]USA.PIPELINE.COM Subject: Re: inservice v.t. On May 24, 1996 08:38:35, 'Orin Hargraves 100422.2566[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]COMPUSERVE.COM ' wrote: Return-Path: owner-ads-l[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UGA.CC.UGA.EDU Received: from uga.cc.uga.edu by usa.pipeline.com (8.6.9/SMI-5.3-PIPELINE-pop-local) id IAA28703; Fri, 24 May 1996 08:43:24 -0400 Message-Id: 199605241243.IAA28703[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]usa.pipeline.com Received: from UGA.CC.UGA.EDU by uga.cc.uga.edu (IBM VM SMTP V2R3) with BSMTP id 3746; Fri, 24 May 96 08:41:44 EDT Received: from UGA.CC.UGA.EDU (NJE origin LISTSERV[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UGA) by UGA.CC.UGA.EDU (LMail V1.2a/1.8a) with BSMTP id 4064; Fri, 24 May 1996 08:41:43 -0400 Date: Fri, 24 May 1996 08:38:35 EDT Reply-To: American Dialect Society ADS-L[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uga.cc.uga.edu Sender: American Dialect Society From: Orin Hargraves 100422.2566[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]COMPUSERVE.COM Subject: inservice v.t. To: Multiple recipients of list ADS-L ADS-L[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uga.cc.uga.edu Below, a quote from a recent e-mail message I received: I was so excited to receive your message!!! This will be great fun now that we have e-mail in our school. We're getting inserviced next Wed. on using it, but I have addresses and am having fun trying all this on my own. I'm still fairly new at learning about the big picture of e-mail and internet... The writer is a K-12 teacher in the upper Midwest. Is this use of "inservice" teacher jargon? Has anyone else heard or seen it? Any info appreciated. With best wishes, Orin Hargraves -- Yes I am a teacher and the term is used to tell about the workshops we have to attend during the school year. Teachers all over the country are reguired to have a certain number of inservice hours. Johnnie Renick ------------------------------ Date: Sat, 25 May 1996 23:02:24 EDT From: Larry Horn LHORN[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]YALEVM.CIS.YALE.EDU Subject: Re: "took a shine to" I doubt it's regional. I think it's standard colloquial American English (what else could explain the fact that both we northeasterners and you deep southerners are on the same intimate terms with shine-taking?), and Webster's 3rd has under SHINE (n.), sense 5: 'a sudden fancy, liking', with the citation "If she takes a shine to you she'll treat you all right". The OED lists is as 'U.S.', glossing it as 'to take a fancy for' (yup, 'for'-- a shine 2 = a fancy 4), with the first citation from 1848 sounding somewhat dialectal to be sure: "My gracious! It's a scorpion thet's took a shine to play with't". The second citation, from 1908, strikes one as more standard: [from W. Churchill] "He took a shine to you that night you saw him'" (And then of course there's the unrequited shine, whence the shiner.) Larry ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 24 May 1996 to 25 May 1996 ************************************************ There are 5 messages totalling 97 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. Words that end in GRY (2) 2. Foul Play at ea.oac.uci.edu 3. ea.oac.uci.edu 4. LJP [AT SYMBOL GOES HERE] http://ljp.la.utk.edu ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Sun, 26 May 1996 14:04:50 -0400 From: Heilan Yvette Grimes HEP2[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]AOL.COM Subject: Words that end in GRY In the past few weeks I've seen this unanswered puzzler pop up in three different circles. So excuse me while I introduce it to this circle which might be able to answer it. The English language has (at least) three words that end in GRY. "Angry" and "hungry" are two of them. What is the third, which purportedly is an everyday word? -- Jim The third word I was always taught was pugry. Also, gry is a word and ends in gry. ------------------------------ Date: Sun, 26 May 1996 11:39:41 -0700 From: Binaifer Irani bina[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]EA.OAC.UCI.EDU Subject: Re: Words that end in GRY I don't know how I became subscribed to this listserv. If anyone can tell me how to become unsubscribed I would appreciate it. Thanks. p.s my address is bina[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uci.edu ------------------------------ Date: Sun, 26 May 1996 13:57:57 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Foul Play at ea.oac.uci.edu I don't know how I became subscribed to this listserv. If anyone can tell me how to become unsubscribed I would appreciate it. Thanks. Last night *67* people on your system all subscribed to ADS-L -- all with Smith at the ends of their names. I sent e-mail to postmaster[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE] ea.oac.uci.edu asking what was going on but haven't heard anything yet from him/her. To unsubscribe, send this command to listserv[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]uga.cc.uga.edu: unsub ADS-L On second thought, now that your posting has confirmed my suspicions that sixty-seven Smiths at ea.oac.uci.edu didn't all decide at once to subscribe to ADS-L, maybe I'll remove them all -- but it will take a while for me to enter all those addresses. (It occurred to me that maybe a teacher named Smith had a class subscribe and used Smith at the end of each userid for some reason. That struck me as pretty far-fetched, though.) --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Sun, 26 May 1996 14:08:52 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: ea.oac.uci.edu It just occurred to me that I don't have any way of knowing whether we had any subscribers at ea.oac.uci.edu before last night. If anybody with that address is a legitimate subscriber, please resub. I'm about to delete everybody with that address. --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Sun, 26 May 1996 16:28:38 -0400 From: "Bethany K. Dumas" dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UTKUX.UTCC.UTK.EDU Subject: LJP [AT SYMBOL GOES HERE] http://ljp.la.utk.edu I am writing to comment on the delay in the current (double) issue of Language in the Judicial Process. Just as we were about to go online, the University of Tennessee laid off with no warning 50+ employees of the UT computing center, including David Hale, the Technical Editor of LJP. I don't yet know whether he will be able to keep an internet account. Further, consulting assistance is now available only at $50 per hour. I may have to learn enough HTML to get this issue out. I'll keep you posted. (Suggestions welcome.) Bethany Bethany K. Dumas, J.D., Ph.D. | Applied Linguistics, Language & Law Dep't of English, UT, Knoxville | EMAIL: dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]utk.edu 415 McClung Tower | (423) 974-6965 | FAX (423) 974-6926 Knoxville, TN 37996-0430 | Editor, Language in the Judicial Process http://ljp.la.utk.edu ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 25 May 1996 to 26 May 1996 ************************************************ There are 3 messages totalling 99 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. Foul Play at ea.oac.uci.edu (3) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Mon, 27 May 1996 00:57:15 -0700 From: Brett Gerry bgerry[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UCI.EDU Subject: Re: Foul Play at ea.oac.uci.edu ------ =_NextPart_000_01BB4B67.7305DF60 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Last night *67* people on your system all subscribed to ADS-L -- all with Smith at the ends of their names. I sent e-mail to postmaster[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE] ea.oac.uci.edu asking what was going on but haven't heard anything yet from him/her. I never subscribed to this listserv.... I was also subscribed to about = a dozen others for some reason. Thanks for removing me... I'll have to = figure out some way of unsubscribing to all the others though. ------ =_NextPart_000_01BB4B67.7305DF60 Content-Type: application/ms-tnef Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64 eJ8+IhAHAQaQCAAEAAAAAAABAAEAAQeQBgAIAAAA5AQAAAAAAADoAAENgAQAAgAAAAIAAgABBJAG ACgBAAABAAAADAAAAAMAADADAAAACwAPDgAAAAACAf8PAQAAAEsAAAAAAAAAgSsfpL6jEBmdbgDd AQ9UAgAAAABBbWVyaWNhbiBEaWFsZWN0IFNvY2lldHkAU01UUABBRFMtTEBVR0EuQ0MuVUdBLkVE VQAAHgACMAEAAAAFAAAAU01UUAAAAAAeAAMwAQAAABUAAABBRFMtTEBVR0EuQ0MuVUdBLkVEVQAA AAADABUMAQAAAAMA/g8GAAAAHgABMAEAAAAbAAAAJ0FtZXJpY2FuIERpYWxlY3QgU29jaWV0eScA AAIBCzABAAAAGgAAAFNNVFA6QURTLUxAVUdBLkNDLlVHQS5FRFUAAAADAAA5AAAAAAsAQDoBAAAA AgH2DwEAAAAEAAAAAAAAA4gxAQiABwAYAAAASVBNLk1pY3Jvc29mdCBNYWlsLk5vdGUAMQgBBIAB ACAAAABSRTogRm91bCBQbGF5IGF0IGVhLm9hYy51Y2kuZWR1AFQKAQWAAwAOAAAAzAcFABsAAAA5 AA8AAQA8AQEggAMADgAAAMwHBQAbAAAANgALAAEANQEBCYABACEAAABDQjExRDhFNjdGQjRDRjEx QTMxQzY4MzAwMkMxMDYyNwAaBwEDkAYAiAMAABIAAAALACMAAAAAAAMAJgAAAAAACwApAAAAAAAD ADYAAAAAAEAAOQAAhIoeoku7AR4AcAABAAAAIAAAAFJFOiBGb3VsIFBsYXkgYXQgZWEub2FjLnVj aS5lZHUAAgFxAAEAAAAWAAAAAbtLoh6K5tgRzrR/Ec+jHGgwAsEGJwAAHgAeDAEAAAAFAAAAU01U UAAAAAAeAB8MAQAAAA8AAABiZ2VycnlAdWNpLmVkdQAAAwAGENzqjTcDAAcQUAEAAB4ACBABAAAA ZQAAAExBU1ROSUdIVCo2NypQRU9QTEVPTllPVVJTWVNURU1BTExTVUJTQ1JJQkVEVE9BRFMtTC0t QUxMV0lUSFNNSVRIQVRUSEVFTkRTT0ZUSEVJUk5BTUVTSVNFTlRFLU1BSUxUT1AAAAAAAgEJEAEA AAALAgAABwIAAPoCAABMWkZ1iLK/8/8ACgEPAhUCqAXrAoMAUALyCQIAY2gKwHNldDI3BgAGwwKD MgPFAgBwckJxEeJzdGVtAoMzdwLkBxMCgH0KgAjPCdk78RYPMjU1AoAKgQ2xC2BgbmcxMDMUUAsD bPhpMzYN8AtVFFEL8hNQmm8T0GMFQAqFTGETwBIgAwBnaAVAKjY3ICogcGVvC1BlIEkCICB5CGEg cxOzIKMHQAMgc3ViBPJiCYAIIHRvFLBEUy1MOCAtLR5SCoUD8HRo9QYAbSDCYQVAINAdUAnwUmQE IG9mIYJpBcBuwmEHgS4gIEkd4AnwOQVAZS0AwAMRH1FwbycTwADAE8FyQAqFZWEELm8A0C51Y2ku pQmAdR5Qc2sLgGcgoIsRgAVAdxwQIGdvJoJZHXFidQVAEYB2CfAnzygBJWALIB5Qbnkg0CaBdQqF eRHAIANSKBAHcC/5IaByLgqHGkobhgr7GqWeYwBAAzABkSMhbmUoQH8d0R67KTEEIBnQE8ARsHK8 di4w0SMhJxIHQHMfYA8erAGgCGAFQGEgZG/+egnwHWAhkRGgKiAFsTGgvQeAIBYQHBACICMBVBGA 3G5rM+QWEARgdiaCB4DdMOMnHnEoIh9CZhxgCHCvHVEn8TRDJxB5IhJ1AID/HrUmgjKCHnEhkjOV INAIYC8ccCr2LGUVMQA8kAADABAQAAAAAAMAERABAAAAQAAHMCCPzbChS7sBQAAIMCCPzbChS7sB HgA9AAEAAAAFAAAAUkU6IAAAAAB86w== ------ =_NextPart_000_01BB4B67.7305DF60-- ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 27 May 1996 06:24:35 -0500 From: Natalie Maynor maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]RA.MSSTATE.EDU Subject: Re: Foul Play at ea.oac.uci.edu I never subscribed to this listserv.... I was also subscribed to about a dozen others for some reason. Thanks for removing me... I'll have to figure out some way of unsubscribing to all the others though. I've removed all the ea.oac.uci.edu addresses, but I'm posting this to the list in case anybody else is interested in the end of the story. I got a reply from the postmaster at UCI last night saying that somebody had gotten into an account on their system and set up scripts to subscribe lots of people to lots of lists. Why anybody would find that amusing I don't know. I found it highly unamusing to sit there deleting sixty-seven addresses yesterday. And I started wondering what a mess the mailboxes of the innocent victims would be in if the prankster included any really active lists in the game-playing. At least ADS-L has low volume. --Natalie (maynor[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]ra.msstate.edu) ------------------------------ Date: Mon, 27 May 1996 10:17:16 -0700 From: David Goldstein-Shirley dsgoldst[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]EA.OAC.UCI.EDU Subject: Re: Foul Play at ea.oac.uci.edu Subscribers, I am one of the UCI victims of the prankster who subscribed us to ADS-L. Your list was one of at least 100 worldwide to which we were subscribed. I regret that someone at our institution thought this was amusing. It has been a nightmare for us, as well as for our system administrator. Thank you for unsubscribing us. That's one down; 99 to go. By the way, I am not a linguist but I have found your conversations pretty interesting! Nevertheless, I need to get off as many lists as I can at this point. Cybervulnerably yours, David Goldstein-Shirley University of California, Irvine ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 26 May 1996 to 27 May 1996 ************************************************ There are 7 messages totalling 234 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. ads ad humor to ADS-L 2. (in)service, v.t. -Reply 3. Client (3) 4. On (and off) my case... (2) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Tue, 28 May 1996 04:52:01 -0700 From: Crissie Trigger crissiet[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]IX.NETCOM.COM Subject: ads ad humor to ADS-L A little distraction on a slow day: 2 female Boston Terrier puppies, 7 wks old, Perfect markings, 555-1234. Leave mess. Lost: small apricot poodle. Reward. Neutered. Like one of the family. Dinner Special -- Turkey $2.35; Chicken or Beef $2.25; Children $2.00. (Taken from the menu at Newt's Diner, no doubt) For sale: an antique desk suitable for lady with thick legs and large drawers. Four-poster bed, 101 years old. Perfect for antique lover. Now is your chance to have your ears pierced and get an extra pair to take home, too. Wanted: 50 girls for stripping machine operators in factory. Wanted: Unmarried girls to pick fresh fruit and produce at night. We do not tear your clothing with machinery. We do it carefully by hand. For Sale. Three canaries of undermined sex. For Sale -- Eight puppies from a German Shepperd and an Alaskan Hussy. Great Dames for sale. Have several very old dresses from grandmother in beautiful condition. Tired of cleaning yourself? Let me do it. Dog for sale: eats anything and is fond of children. Vacation Special: have your home exterminated. Mt. Kilimanjaro, the breathtaking backdrop for the Serena Lodge. Swim in the lovely pool while you drink it all in. Get rid of aunts: Zap does the job in 24 hours. Sheer stockings. Designed for fancy dress, but so serviceable that lots of women wear nothing else. Stock up and save. Limit: one. For Rent: 6-room hated apartment. Man, honest. Will take anything. Wanted: chambermaid in rectory. Love in, $200 a month. References required. Man wanted to work in dynamite factory. Must be willing to travel. Used Cars: Why go elsewhere to be cheated? Come here first! Christmans tag-sale. Handmade gifts for the hard-to-find person. Wanted: Hair-cutter. Excellent growth potential. Wanted. Man to take care of cow that does not smoke or drink. 3-year-old teacher need for pre-school. Experience preferred. Our experienced Mom will care of your child. Fenced yard, meals, and smacks included. Our bikinis are exciting. They are simply the tops. Auto Repair Service. Free pick-up and delivery. Try us once, you'll never go anywhere again. Illiterate? Write today for free help. Girl wanted to assist magician in cutting-off-head illusion. Blue Cross and salary. Wanted. Widower with school-age children requires person to assume general housekeeping duties. Must be capable of contributing to growth of family. And now, the Superstore--unequaled in size, unmatched in variety, unrivaled inconvenience. We will oil your sewing machine and adjust tension in your home for $1.00. ======================================================= ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 28 May 1996 09:23:12 -0500 From: Molly Dickmeyer dickmeye[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]JBLSMTP.PHL.LRPUB.COM Subject: (in)service, v.t. -Reply Try nursing for deliberately obfuscating jargon. I encounter "client" constantly when editing nursing books--a nurse told me they don't consider it depersonalizing, it's a way of denoting wellness (another of my favorite overused nursing terms)--for instance, in gerontological nursing, they don't wish to imply that aging is an illness, so they prefer client to patient. An admirable aim, but boy do they take it too far. I love encountering the serviced/served slip-up. I grew up on a farm too. Molly Connors (married name, accounts not changed yet) dickmeye[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]phl.lrpub.com Beverly Flanigan FLANIGAN[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]OUVAXA.CATS.OHIOU.EDU 05/25/96 07:56pm EXCERPTED with me but then added that she often feels these children aren't "serviced" adequately. Having grown up on a farm in Minnesota, I know another meaning for "serviced." Talk about adding insult to injury. Educationese is full of such depersonalizing jargon, as is Speech/Hearing Clinic talk, where even schoolchildren are "clients." ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 28 May 1996 09:58:20 -0400 From: Wayne Glowka wglowka[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MAIL.GAC.PEACHNET.EDU Subject: Client "Client" is also the term used by psychological counselors for the people that come to see them for professional help. Use of the word seems to be an attempt to be non-judgmental about people with different kinds of psychological needs. Counselors want people in general to know that one may seek counseling without having a serious disorder or problem. Ideally, the services they provide can be summarized in counseling terms as "personal development." Wayne Glowka Professor of English Director of Research and Graduate Student Services Georgia College Milledgeville, GA 31061 912-453-4222 wglowka[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]mail.gac.peachnet.edu ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 28 May 1996 10:54:07 -0400 From: "M. Lynne Murphy" 104LYN[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MUSE.ARTS.WITS.AC.ZA Subject: Re: Client clients are also what speech therapists have, and i suppose what most medical professionals and quasi-medical professionals have. (except, i suspect, doctors.) social workers have them too. i don't mind it at all--i find the term a bit empowering (as opposed to _patient_). _client_ underscores the fact that i can take my business elsewhere, should i be unhappy with the service i'm getting. (and i'm anything but patient with medical professionals.) lynne --------------------------------------------------------------------- M. Lynne Murphy 104lyn[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]muse.arts.wits.ac.za Department of Linguistics phone: 27(11)716-2340 University of the Witwatersrand fax: 27(11)716-8030 Johannesburg 2050 SOUTH AFRICA ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 28 May 1996 13:15:58 -0500 From: Silke Van Ness sv478[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CNSVAX.ALBANY.EDU Subject: Re: Client My understanding is that one needs an M.D. degree to be allowed to use the term patient. A psychiatrist has patients or has that been changed to client now? -- Silke Van Ness Germanic & Slavic Languages and Literatures University at Albany, SUNY HU 216 Albany, NY 12222 E-mail: sv478[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]cnsvax.albany.edu Ph: (518)442-4122 Fax:(5l8)442-4217 On Tue, 28 May 1996, Wayne Glowka wrote: "Client" is also the term used by psychological counselors for the people that come to see them for professional help. Use of the word seems to be an attempt to be non-judgmental about people with different kinds of psychological needs. Counselors want people in general to know that one may seek counseling without having a serious disorder or problem. Ideally, the services they provide can be summarized in counseling terms as "personal development." Wayne Glowka Professor of English Director of Research and Graduate Student Services Georgia College Milledgeville, GA 31061 912-453-4222 wglowka[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]mail.gac.peachnet.edu ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 28 May 1996 17:01:06 -0400 From: Jules Levin jflevin[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UCRAC1.UCR.EDU Subject: On (and off) my case... Speaking of social workers (in the "client" discussion), is there any disagreement that the expressions "to be on someone's case" and "get off my case...", referring to hassling someone about anything, probably arose in Welfare recipient jargon. A social worker has X # of cases; when they start coming around and asking awkward questions it is because they are working "on your case." So you tell them to "get off my case!!" As I recall, these expressions entered general usage (baby-boomer and younger) from below; I first heard them as underclass slang... Any disagreement? Jules Levin UCR ------------------------------ Date: Tue, 28 May 1996 17:32:51 PDT From: Duane Campbell dcamp[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]EPIX.NET Subject: Re: On (and off) my case... --- On Tue, 28 May 1996 17:01:06 -0400 Jules Levin jflevin[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UCRAC1.UCR.EDU wrote: Speaking of social workers (in the "client" discussion), is there any disagreement that the expressions "to be on someone's case" and "get off my case...", referring to hassling someone about anything, probably arose in Welfare recipient jargon. I think it goes back further than that. In my personal experience, it refers to police. ------------------------------------- Duane Campbell dcamp[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]epix.net In the beginning the Earth was without form and void. Why didn't they leave well enough alone? ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 27 May 1996 to 28 May 1996 ************************************************ There are 6 messages totalling 227 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. grow up (3) 2. PADS 79 3. Name that person, or a question for Virginia 4. vowels for Bosnia ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Wed, 29 May 1996 00:19:01 -0700 From: david k deford deforddk[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CBVCP.COM Subject: grow up i really enjoyed the "a little distraction on a slow day" collection. i must, however, strongly protest the insulting little editorial dig at the Honorable Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, Newt Gingrich. if you could only understand how truly ignorant this kind of anti-responsible, childish demonization of a truly awesome man makes you appear, you would cry in shame. why prostitute yourself to support the people who labor to destroy the good in America? why couldn't you just let the humor roar forth on its own without your little political meddling? grow up. ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 29 May 1996 19:31:44 +0800 From: Russ McClay mcclay[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]PROQC.COM.TW Subject: Re: grow up Well...the little distraction "grows"... Personally I don't give a hoot about Newt. He arrived in the Public Light long after I left the country and therefore know little about him other than his meteroic rise to fame which, for me, signals the likelihood of meteroic vaporization. No newts here in Taipei. A few giant salamanders perhaps. ODD: Has "strategize" been heard outside of the Flintstone's movie? Dialectically, Russ -- m c c l a y ................................................................... mcclay[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]proqc.com.tw http://www.proqc.com/~mcclay/ ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 29 May 1996 07:16:39 PDT From: "//www.usa.net/~ague" ague[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]REDRCK.ENET.DEC.COM Subject: Re: grow up i really enjoyed the "a little distraction on a slow day" collection. i must, however, strongly protest the insulting little editorial dig at the Honorable Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, Newt Gingrich. if you could only understand how truly ignorant this kind of anti-responsible, childish demonization of a truly awesome man makes you appear, you would cry in shame. why prostitute yourself to support the people who labor to destroy the good in America? why couldn't you just let the humor roar forth on its own without your little political meddling? grow up. ROTFL. I really love it when a little humor is thrown in here too. -- Jim ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 29 May 1996 16:23:59 -0400 From: Allan Metcalf AAllan[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]AOL.COM Subject: PADS 79 At long last, the American Dialect Society is pleased to announce publication of: Publication of the American Dialect Society No. 79, Under Cover of Law: More on the Legality of Surreptitious Recordings by Thomas E. Murray with the assistance of Carmin D. Ross-Murray. This is a sequel to their essay "On the Legality and Ethics of Surreptitious Recording" in PADS 76 (1991). The new volume updates the information on federal and state laws, offers further explanations, and answers questions posed by readers of that essay. The 80-page volume, PADS 79, is available for $12 plus shipping from the University of Alabama Press, Box 870380, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487-0380; phone (800) 825-9980. The earlier 88-page volume, PADS 76, is available for $11. But there is another way. All members of the American Dialect Society get issues of PADS as part of their membership. If you are a current member, you will get your copy soon; the mailing is being prepared in Tuscaloosa right now. If you are not yet a member but join by June 30, your membership will include PADS 79. Membership is $30 per calendar year, $15 for students. Send payment to ADS Executive Secretary Allan Metcalf, English Department, MacMurray College, Jacksonville, Illinois 62650. For further information on ADS, see our Web site, http://www.msstate.edu/Archives/ADS/ ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 29 May 1996 17:58:24 EDT From: Terry Lynn Irons t.irons[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MOREHEAD-ST.EDU Subject: Name that person, or a question for Virginia I am attempting to gather some information about several people who conducted interviews as field workers for the LANCS project--it seems like there were a blue million of them. Any help identifying the field workers, locating them ,or info about them will be useful. Name Worked in Mackey Michigan Reynard Ohio Richmond Ohio Obie Ohio Bender Ohio, Indiana Motherwell (SP) Ohio, Indiana (?) Billiard Indiana Carmony Indiana Dykes Indiana Orrickk Indiana Stephens Illinois Wilson Illinois Garbutt Illinois, Kentucky I should probably know who some of these people are, but I am just a youngster! Terry Irons -- (*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*) Terry Lynn Irons t.irons[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]morehead-st.edu Voice Mail: (606) 783-5164 Snail Mail: UPO 604 Morehead, KY 40351 (*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*)=(*) ------------------------------ Date: Wed, 29 May 1996 17:00:35 -0600 From: Ellen Johnson EJOHNSON[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]MSUVX1.MEMPHIS.EDU Subject: vowels for Bosnia I've been away for a couple of weeks. Forgive me if you've already seen this. Ellen CLINTON DEPLOYS VOWELS TO BOSNIA Cities of Sjlbvdnzv, Grzny to Be First Recipients Before an emergency joint session of Congress yesterday, President Clinton announced US plans to deploy over 75,000 vowels to the war-torn region of Bosnia. The deployment, the largest of its kind in American history, will provide the region with the critically needed letters A,E,I,O and U, and is hoped to render countless Bosnian names more pronounceable. "For six years, we have stood by while names like Ygrjvslhv and Tzlynhr and Glrm have been horribly butchered by millions around the world," Clinton said. "Today, the United States must finally stand up and say 'Enough.' It is time the people of Bosnia finally had some vowels in their incomprehensible words. The US is proud to lead the crusade in this noble endeavour." The deployment, dubbed Operation Vowel Storm by the State Department, is set for early next week, with the Adriatic port cities of Sjlbvdnzv and Grzny slated to be the first recipients. Two C-130 transport planes, each carrying over 500 24-count boxes of "E's," will fly from Andrews Air Force Base across the Atlantic and airdrop the letters over the cities. Citizens of Grzny and Sjlbvdnzv eagerly await the arrival of the vowels. "My God, I do not think we can last another day," Trszg Grzdnjkln, 44, said. "I have six children and none of them has a name that is understandable to me or to anyone else. Mr. Clinton, please send my poor, wretched family just one 'E.' Please." If the initial airlift is successful, Clinton said the United States will go ahead with full-scale vowel deployment, with C-130's airdropping thousands more letters over every area of Bosnia. Other nations are expected to pitch in as well, including 10,000 British "A's" and 6,500 Canadian "U's." Japan, rich in A's and O's, was asked to participate, but declined. "With these valuable letters, the people of war-ravaged Bosnia will be able to make some terrific new words," Clinton said. "It should be very exciting for them, and much easier for us to read their maps." Linguists praise the US's decision to send the vowels. For decades they have struggled with the hard consonants and difficult pronunciation of most Slavic words. "Vowels are crucial to construction of all language," an Illinois Institute of Technology multimedia specialist said. "Without them, it would be difficult to utter a single word, much less organize a coherent sentence. Please, just don't get me started on the moon-man languages they use in those Eastern European countries." According to the multimedia specialist who wished to remain anonymous, once the Bosnians have vowels, they will be able to construct such valuable sentences as: "The potatoes are ready;" "I believe it will rain." and "Can you give me another box of ammo and a few grenades?" The airdrop represents the largest deployment of any letter to a foreign country since 1979. During the summer of that year, President Jimmy Carter ordered the shipment of 92,000 consonants to Ethiopia, providing cities like Ouaouoaua, Eaoiiuae, and Aao with vital, life-giving supplies of L's, S's and T's. The consonant-relief effort failed, however, when vast quantities of the letters were intercepted and horded by violent, gun-toting warlords. j ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 28 May 1996 to 29 May 1996 ************************************************ There is one message totalling 37 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. LJP 2.1-2 - finally! ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Thu, 30 May 1996 15:47:12 -0400 From: "Bethany K. Dumas, U of Tennessee" dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]UTKVX.UTK.EDU Subject: LJP 2.1-2 - finally! URL: http://ljp.la.utk.edu Language in the Judicial Process Special Double Issue! CONTENTS Volume 2, Numbers 1 & 2 May 1996 Joint International Conference on Law and Society: Abstracts of papers to be given at the conference. Research in Progress: A call for involvement in an exciting research project. New Books! New books of interest to language and law professionals. Opportunities for reviewers. Current citations in the field. With new additions since last issue emphasized in bold text. Missing an issue? Be sure and check out the LJP archives. Last Updated: 05/20/96 Analyst/Contact: Bethany K. Dumas, Editor E-Mail Address: dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]utk.edu Bethany K. Dumas, J.D., Ph.D. | Applied Linguistics, Language & Law Dep't of English, UT, Knoxville | EMAIL: dumasb[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]utk.edu 415 McClung Tower | (423) 974-6965 | FAX (423) 974-6926 Knoxville, TN 37996-0430 | See Webpage at http://ljp.la.utk.edu ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 29 May 1996 to 30 May 1996 ************************************************ There are 2 messages totalling 51 lines in this issue. Topics of the day: 1. swooft/rustin 2. vowels for Bosnia ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Fri, 31 May 1996 16:44:38 -0600 From: "Gregory J. Pulliam" gpulliam[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CHARLIE.CNS.IIT.EDU Subject: swooft/rustin Growing up in Mississippi, I used (and still use) "swooft" (_oo_ rhymes with the "oo" in "book") in negative sentences to describe a person or action that failed to display a lot of intelligence, as in "he's not too swooft" or "that wasn't very swooft." Of course the usage parallels precisely (as far as I can gather) the more standard use of "swift." Is there regional variation in usage for "swooft"? In the Ms delta, the term "rustin" was used (1975-77) to refer to a person considered to be more or less of a bumpkin. It was college-age folks using the term, and I have never heard it anywhere (or anytime) else. Anybody else heard it? Greg Pulliam Gregory Pulliam Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago, IL gpulliam[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]charlie.acc.iit.edu ------------------------------ Date: Fri, 31 May 1996 16:49:56 -0600 From: "Gregory J. Pulliam" gpulliam[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]CHARLIE.CNS.IIT.EDU Subject: Re: vowels for Bosnia Illinois Institute of Technology multimedia specialist said. "Without them, it would be difficult to utter a single word, much less organize a coherent sentence. Please, just don't get me started on the moon-man languages they use in those Eastern European countries." According to the multimedia specialist who wished to remain anonymous, once the Bosnians have vowels, they will be able to construct such valuable sentences as: "The potatoes are ready;" "I believe it will rain." and "Can you give me another box of ammo and a few grenades?" Forgive me, but I'm trying to figure out who's riffing on IIT, and why. Not that they shouldn't, of course--there's no shortage of potential material here. Greg Pulliam Illinois Institute of Technology Gregory Pulliam Illinois Institute of Technology Chicago, IL gpulliam[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]charlie.acc.iit.edu ------------------------------ End of ADS-L Digest - 30 May 1996 to 31 May 1996 ************************************************ .