Date: Thu, 15 Jun 1995 09:39:57 -0500 From: Molly Dickmeyer Subject: Teen Slang Terms (Gank and Gaffle) -Reply Randy: Where and when I grew up (south central PA 20 yrs ago) "gank" referred to the voluntary ability to expel saliva from the mouth without spitting, or the involuntary rush of saliva in the mouth when tasting or smelling something strong (this is harder to explain than I thought!). Odd, I know. Molly >>> Randy Roberts 06/14/95 10:26am >>> I picked up two odd terms (odd to me) from junior high students in Columbia, Missouri. The first is "to gank" meaning to physically assault or intimidate someone in order to steal from them. As in, I ganked his bicycle. The only other place I have seen this term is in Paul Dickson's 1990 book, Slang! The Topic by Topic Dictionary of Contemporary American Lingoes. On page 217 Paul lists gank meaning flirt. The second word is entirely new to me. It is "to gaffle" (spelling?) meaning simply to steal something from someone without violence or their awareness. As in, she didn't know it, but I gaffled a stick of gum from her purse. My sources are only oral. The informants had no clue as to etymology but they said both terms were old. But then, old to teenagers can mean last week. Randy Roberts University of Missouri-Columbia robertsr[AT SYMBOL GOES HERE]